Dana Farber Cancer Institute....!

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Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

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Published Date : 2014-02-19T18:13:04.000Z

This introduction to Dana-Farber provides a look at the history of the Institute, explores the core values that underlie its work, and highlights some of the ways employees take an active part in fundraising and volunteering. Learn more about working at Dana-Farber: http://www.dana-farber.org/abo/working/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 295

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Published Date : 2017-11-07T15:19:08.000Z

Laurie H. Glimcher, MD, Dana-Farber’s President and CEO, gives Visiting Committee members an update on the excellent progress in research and care initiatives at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2174

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Published Date : 2015-09-02T17:08:37.000Z

Christina Dixon, who was 22 when diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma, looks back on her experience coming to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute as a young adult. Learn more about Dana-Farber's Young Adult Program by visiting www.dana-farber.org/youngadults. Music: "Tell Me" by Alialujah Choir Transcription: When I came to Dana-Farber for the first time, it was really scary. I was 22 and had just found out about the diagnosis, and I really didn’t know what to expect. Once I found out about my diagnosis, it was actually just a day before I came in and met Dr. Fischer. When I came in for my first infusion appointment, I started out by going to lab services, where they checked me in and gave me schedule for what I would be doing for the day, and walked me through exactly where I would need to go and who I would be meeting with. I was really impressed with how organized everything was, but also how nice and caring everyone was. When I met Kerry for the first time, I walked in and she had a big smile on her face and welcomed me and told me exactly where I was going to be going. I just immediately felt like she was going to be a really important person in my treatment. Kerry was very patient with me and explained to me exactly what I would be doing. She took my initial labs, and I found out that she would be my infusion nurse for most of my treatments. Kerry really inspired me to never lose my sense of humor regardless of the circumstances, and I’ll never forget how she was just always very positive. So, when I met Dr. Fischer, I sat down with him and we talked through what he had seen from the biopsy and what he believed was the best treatment for my cancer. He was very, very patient with me, and I walked in with a lot of questions, and he went through each question with me and took time to help me understand what the side effects would be and what to expect. I had a lot of confidence in both Dana-Farber and specifically Dr. Fischer as my doctor. He would stop by every chemo appointment and ask how I was doing and make sure if there that was really bothering me, he would help me figure out a solution to it. In a very scary time, they were able to make me feel much more secure. The more I came, the more I got to know them and they got to know me, and as they realized what kind of personality I have, they were able to give me advice that was very effective and that was specific to my personality type. When I transitioned to surveillance, it was the most difficult experience of my life, and I wasn’t expecting that. Because they knew me, they were able to steer me in the right direction in terms of finding resources, whether it was talking to social workers or getting involved with the young adult program, and that ended up being a really important of my cancer experience. I met with a couple of different people in the program—specifically Karen [Faciano 03:01], who helped me find a place where I was able to contribute and meet other young adults. I found about the annual conference and attended that, and through some of the workshops met other young adults. For the first time, I realized that the things that I was struggling with were completely normal and that I wasn’t the only one who felt isolated because of cancer. At the time, Karen and the young adult team—they were developing the online platform to help young adults at Dana-Farber connect to each other. I was able to attend the focus groups on that and help in designing the website, and that was really meaningful to be a part of that. At the end of treatment, I was really scared, because I was afraid that the support I had had during treatment was going to end, and I quickly realized that my care team here for me whenever I needed any support or help. I immediately began to feel a sense of freedom, that I could go out and do the things that I was afraid the cancer would take away from me.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 8852

Likes : 72

DisLikes : 7

Published Date : 2018-02-02T21:15:45.000Z

Kenneth Anderson, MD, envisions the future of multiple myeloma treatment with novel therapies, including proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs, as well as therapies for smoldering disease. Learn more about the Multiple Myeloma Program at Dana-Farber. https://www.dana-farber.org/multiple-myeloma-program/ View more presentations from the 2017 Multiple Myeloma patient Education Symposium at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. http://www.dana-farber.org/health-library/videos/multiple-myeloma-patient-symposium-video-presentations/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 7801

Likes : 5

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Published Date : 2011-04-15T14:19:35.000Z

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute's Yawkey Center offers many amenities to help ease the burden of cancer treatment on patients and families. The Yawkey Center was built with input from patients, who worked closely with Dana-Farber's staff to design some of the most important features. More: http://www.dana-farber.org/yawkey
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 28340

Likes : 93

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Published Date : 2007-11-12T14:43:39.000Z

As they watched each other across Jimmy Fund Way, patients in the Jimmy Fund Clinic and ironworkers constructing a new Dana-Farber building formed a silent but powerful connection. Based on a true story.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2072

Likes : 11

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Published Date : 2015-05-01T17:34:06.000Z

The Profile research study is creating one of the largest databases of genetic abnormalities in cancer. More than 15,000 tumor samples have been genetically sequenced and the results are beginning to shed more light on just what makes certain cancers tick. In this video, scientists show how genetic testing in cancer happens -- from tumor sample collection to data analysis -- and talk about the promise that the technology holds for cancer research and care. More information about Profile — a collaboration between Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital — is at Http://www.dana-farber.org/Profile. Transcription: Speaker 1: Just dropping off some specimens. Speaker 2: Thank you. Reporter: It’s here in the pathology lab where tumor samples are brought in for testing. The samples are from cancer patients who have consented to be part of the Profile Project, a large research study to help speed the development of personalized cancer care with precision treatments. Dr. William Hahn is the deputy chief scientific officer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He helps lead the joint project with Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Hahn: We’re really excited about it, because it really represents our first foray into using molecular techniques to understand cancers, rather than anatomical criteria, and that means that all of the knowledge we’ve learned over the last 30 or 40 years about what makes cancers tick, we can now try to get at the basis of that within the DNA of a tumor. Reporter: To get the DNA, technologists isolate a sample from the tumor, and then it’s put on a slide to be checked by pathologists for quality. Dr. Neil Lindeman is the direct of the Center for Advanced Molecular Diagnostics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where the tumor samples are then processed. Dr. Lindeman: What we’re trying to do is we’re trying to understand the genetic causes of cancers—what genes specifically are causing what cancer and how it behaves in each patient, one at at a time. And we’re using a very sophisticated and high-throughput technology that enables us to test for a lot of different changes—hundreds at once—in a lot of different patients. Reporter: That sophisticated technology allows scientists to scan tumor DNA for cancer-related abnormalities in more than 300 genes. Dr. Lindeman: This is the instrument that we use to fragment DNA… Reporter: One of the first steps in the process is breaking up the DNA into small fragments using a sonicator. Dr. Lindeman: To the principle of sonication is sound waves—ultrasound—setting up vibrations that sheer the DNA, and by tuning the sonicator to the right frequency, you can generate fragments that are roughly equal size. Reporter: Those DNA fragments are then placed into a sequencer, which uses light signals and a computer to read each letter of the DNA code and look for cancer-related changes. Dr. Hahn: What modern sequencers do is instead of doing this in a one-base-at-a-time linear manner, they sequence thousands or hundreds of thousands of pieces of DNA in a parallel manner, and then we reassemble all of that data to come up with the overall sequence. So, one way to think about this is instead of doing things one after another after another, we’re doing a million processes all at once and then taking that data and combining it at the end. Reporter: With the sequencing complete, the data are interpreted by a team of cancer investigators. The goal is to identify the specific cause of the patient’s cancer and then determine which treatment will be the most effective. Now that the project has logged more than 5,000 tumor profiles, researchers are starting to look for leads to new cancer discoveries. Dr. Lindeman: Well, I’d like to see this being done for everybody routinely continuing, and I’d like to see this transition from being a research project to a clinical project. I think results should be available in the medical record, and physicians taking care of patients should be able to see these results and act on them. Dr. Hahn: So, in the past, when we’ve looked at cancers using the best tools that we had, it was largely looking at a black box. We could discern the edges and feel a little bit about what it was that cancer might be, but we had know way of comprehensively interrogating exactly what makes up cancer. This is the first step to being able to take away that black box and really understand what it is that makes a cancer tick.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 181

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Published Date : 2018-09-06T13:25:47.000Z

Thomas A. Abrams, MD Medical Oncologist, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 603

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Published Date : 2018-11-06T19:44:04.000Z

Every person is so different genetically and is an individual unto themselves. At Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center, we have an infrastructure that allows us to pick the best treatments for each person. Right now, you have cancer. But what your cancer doesn’t know is, You Have Us. Learn more about cancer care at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s at https://www.youhaveus.org
    

Channel Title : Cancer Research Institute

Views : 1372

Likes : 6

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Published Date : 2016-05-26T15:34:47.000Z

David Reardon, M.D., clinical director of the Center for Neuro-Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and member of Cancer Research Institute’s Clinical Trials Network, answers pressing questions from patients about cancer immunotherapy. For more, visit cancerresearch.org/askascientist
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 85530

Likes : 350

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Published Date : 2015-06-18T14:00:48.000Z

How does immunotherapy fight cancer? If you take the brakes off the immune system, you can unleash an attack on cancer cells. That's the theory behind PD-1/PD-L1, a vitally important immunotherapy discovery illustrated in this video. You can learn more about the PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors and how Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is using immunotherapy here: http://www.dana-farber.org/Newsroom/P... Transcription: Hello, and welcome to Dana-Farber Science Illustrated. Today, we’re going to be taking a closer look at how scientists use drug agents to help our immune system discover cancerous cells. Our bodies are made up of trillions of cells, which work together to keep us healthy. One group of white blood cells, known as T-cells, act as our own, personal guards. They patrol our bodies relentlessly for signs of infection or other diseases and attack them aggressively. While on patrol, T-cells use specialized protein receptors on their surface to latch onto cells and fully inspect them for signs that they may be cancerous. Once they’ve made a confirmation, T-cells summon an attack on diseased cells. However, sometimes the T-cells aren’t able to recognize the bad cancer cells, and they never attack. Scientists have found that many cancer cells carry proteins that act like masks and allow them to blend in with healthy cells. One protein in particular that cancer cells use for this deception is called PD-L1. When T-cells use their PD-1 protein to latch onto cancer cells’ PD-L1 protein, they’re fooled into thinking that cancerous cells are actually healthy ones. They then leave the cancer cells alone and allow them to go on multiplying in the body. Scientists realized that if they could find a way to block PD-L1 on cancer cells, then the T-cells could unleash an attack on them. This discovery led to the development of drugs made from natural, human antibodies that block PD-1/PD-L1 protein interaction. The T-cells are then able to recognize the cancer cells and begin their attack. Thank you for joining us on this brief look at the exciting field of Immunotherapy. For more information, visit discovercarebelieve.org. And, until next time, this has been Dana-Farber Science Illustrated.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 4810

Likes : 38

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Published Date : 2011-11-29T14:10:28.000Z

Siddartha Mukherjee, MD, PhD, author of "The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer," talks about the role of Dana-Farber in the story of cancer research and explains how Sidney Farber, MD, "the father of chemotherapy," helped move conversation about cancer from a private to a public arena.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2772

Likes : 23

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2016-11-14T14:23:12.000Z

A group of young Dana-Farber patients of various ages, with different diagnoses and in different stages of their lives, came together to talk about the ways their identities have changed after being diagnosed with cancer. In this video , they share their unique knowledge in hope of informing and educating their peers, friends, and family about what it’s like to have cancer as a young adult.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 217

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Published Date : 2018-09-06T13:52:18.000Z

Anuj Patel, MD Medical Oncologist, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 125

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-09-06T13:55:34.000Z

Jeffrey S. Wisch, MD Medical Oncologist, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    

Channel Title : Cancer Research Institute

Views : 1890

Likes : 3

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2016-05-12T17:21:35.000Z

David Reardon, M.D., clinical director of the Center for Neuro-Oncology at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and member of Cancer Research Institute’s Clinical Trials Network, answers pressing questions from patients about cancer immunotherapy. For more, visit cancerresearch.org/askascientist
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1526

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2016-05-02T20:14:49.000Z

Lisa Scherber didn't start out in her career with the goal of being a "play lady." But after more than 23 years, the director of patient and family programs can't imagine doing anything else. Watch how Scherber and her team help pediatric cancer patients and their families, and learn why she does what she does.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2734

Likes : 13

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2013-07-19T19:26:02.000Z

Five young men and women being treated at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute candidly discuss with Karen Fasciano, PsyD, issues they have encountered since diagnosis and how they have coped with them. Topics include life disruptions, peer support, relationships, treatment transitions, life perspective and lessons learned. Learn more about Dana-Farber's Young Adult Program at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Patient-and-Family-Support/Young-Adult-Program.aspx.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 287

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Published Date : 2018-11-19T15:48:17.000Z

On Friday, November 16, 2018, the Executive Council for the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute held its tenth annual Beyond Boston Luncheon. Watch these highlights to hear speakers educate guests on the latest advances in research and clinical care. The funds raised at the Luncheon are instrumental in enabling physician-researchers at the Susan F. Smith Center to continue their groundbreaking work in the discovery and treatment of women’s cancers. Learn more about how you can make a difference by visiting www.susanfsmith.org
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 107

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Published Date : 2018-12-12T20:15:10.000Z

Ursula A. Matulonis, MD, describes her approach to caring for women with gynecologic cancer. To learn more about the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, visit: http://www.dana-farber.org/susan-f-smith-center-for-womens-cancers/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 4095

Likes : 7

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Published Date : 2011-09-19T14:50:38.000Z

When young Charlie went home to begin recovery after his stem cell transplant, he had to limit his exposure to other people for a year to prevent infection. How do you do that in a family with three boys? Here, Charlie's mom and brothers describe the challenges (and benefits) of isolation after a stem cell transplant. More on Charlie's leukemia treatment journey: http://www.dana-farber.org/CharliesStory When Charlie began receiving care for acute lymphoblastic leukemia at Dana-Farber/Children's Hospital Cancer Center at age 4, his mother, Caroline, sent email updates to her large family and circle of friends. After a brief remission, Charlie's cancer came back, and he returned for more treatment, including a stem cell transplant. Caroline's reflections grew into a touching chronicle of four years in the life of a child with cancer. Transcription: Text: Getting Through Post-Transplant Isolation Caroline: It was really scary when Charlie came home from the hospital after transplant. You come home with a list of things you can and cannot do. No one could be in the house except for Charlie’s home nurse, and he had a home tutor. It’s weird that no one can come in our house for a year, and that Charlie couldn’t go anywhere for a year. Max: There were a lot of places that we couldn’t go, a lot of things that we couldn’t do, or that he wasn’t able to do. Caroline: He could be outside and playing, but he couldn’t hug anybody. People had to try to keep a three-foot barrier around him, which was weird… but we did it. Harry: Well, I definitely got angry at the situation but never at Charlie. Yeah… It never really bugged me that much—I just got around it. Max: We made the best of it. We couldn’t go anywhere in the world, so we brought places of the world to here. Caroline: In terms of the boys’ friends coming over to visit—I have to say—I loved that they had to stay outside. I wanted to continue that. I have three boys. If they each had a friend over, I suddenly have six boys in the house. And my boys are getting gigantic, so their friends are getting gigantic, and I walk in and think, “What is happening here? Who are all these big monsters in my house?” So, it’s… They loved it. We still had kids visiting all the time. They just had a blast. Harry: In the winter, it was kind of difficult, because friends wouldn’t want to stay as long, because they couldn’t go inside to warm up. But usually it was pretty good. We would play outside for awhile, and as long as we kept moving we would stay warm, and after awhile—after we got bored—we’d just go into the garage and close all the doors up in there. Max: We got Mom to bring down hot chocolate, candy canes… Harry: And some snacks, and that would be great, and we’d just hang out in there. Max: We would open the hatchback of our mom’s car and sit down right there. The back seats would be down, so we could just sit down there. Caroline: It was like a tailgate party—they’d have a blast. When their toes were warmed up, they’d go back outside again. Max: We had some pretty fun times in there. Caroline: The bad part was that they couldn’t come in to use the bathroom, and they never asked me if they could go to the neighbor’s house, so I can only imagine where they went to the bathroom.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1435

Likes : 9

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-06-07T16:38:16.000Z

Watch how Dana-Farber Cancer Institute coordinates patient care through Team Training, an interdisciplinary approach to delivering safe, high quality, patient-centered care. Learn more about how we care for our patients at www.dana-farber.org.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 107

Likes : 1

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-12-13T17:22:43.000Z

Brian M. Wolpin, MD, MPH Medical Oncology, Gastrointestinal Cancer, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2115

Likes : 5

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2012-03-20T20:30:42.000Z

Medical oncologist Dr. Daniel Morganstern discusses his work in the breast oncology center and describes Dana-Farber's focus on the complex and individualized medical and emotional needs of patients. Learn more about how Dana-Farber's physicians treat breast cancer at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Breast-Cancer-Treatment-Center.aspx.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 5380

Likes : 6

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2015-02-09T16:34:40.000Z

Oral chemotherapy is a cancer-fighting drug given by mouth in tablet, capsule, or liquid form. Learn how to handle oral chemotherapy safely at home. Read more about oral chemotherapy at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Chemotherapy.aspx#Oral_Chemotherapy Transcription: It is very important that you take your oral chemotherapy safely at home. This video will offer you some easy tips to follow. Keep your medicine in its original container. Do not use a pill box. Do not mix your pills in a case or bag with other pills. Do not store your oral chemo in your bathroom, because the moisture might damage the pills. Do not keep your oral chemo on a window sill. Keep your oral chemo in a safe place. Your doctor or nurse will tell you if it needs special storage. For example, some medications are kept in the refrigerator. Wash your hands thoroughly before and after you take your pills. Do not crush, break, or chew your pills. If you can’t swallow your pills, call your care team. Take your pills as directed and at the same time every day. Do not flush your pills down the toilet. Do not dump them down the sink. Do not throw them away in the trash. Return your extra pills to the pharmacy where the prescription was filled.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 744

Likes : 9

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-06-14T21:14:26.000Z

Judy Garber, MD, MPH, Director of the Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention, describes Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a hereditary disorder that increases the risk of developing several types of cancer, and ways that individuals and families can manage this diagnosis. For more information, visit: http://www.dana-farber.org/cancergenetics
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2007

Likes : 9

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2014-02-06T16:34:12.000Z

For more information, recipes, and nutrition tips, and to watch more videos on Eating Well During Cancer, visit http://www.dana-farber.org/eatingwell. Vitamins and supplements are a big area of conversation, controversy, and research. When considering ways to ensure that you are getting the nutrients you need for optimal health, Dana-Farber nutrition specialist Stacy Kennedy explains why it's important to think about the benefits of "food first." Transcription: I’m Stacy Kennedy, a nutrition specialist for Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. Welcome to Eating Well During Cancer. Today I’d like to talk with you about vitamins and supplements—what’s OK, what might be beneficial, and what should you avoid. Vitamins and supplements are a big area of conversation, controversy, and research right now. But before we get into details around vitamin pills, I’d like to take a step back and think about the benefits of food first. A lot of research on vitamins and supplements comes out of data looking at what people were eating in their diet. We know that people who eat a variety of plant-based foods can gain a variety of important health-promoting nutrients that we call ‘phytonutrients.’ It’s really important to think about eating by the rainbow. Getting some red fruits and vegetables, what makes a tomato red is an antioxidant called ‘lycopene’ that’s going through a lot of research to see its potential role or benefit in prostate cancer. We have orange. What makes a carrot orange or a sweet potato have that vibrant, bright, orange hue is another antioxidant in the same family called ‘betacarotene.’ We also have yellow, like mango and banana. We know that green vegetables have a variety of important nutrients. Don’t forget about blue or purple—that anthocyanin that makes the blueberry blue is an antioxidant that can benefit our immune system as well. Then there’s also the white family, which is often overlooked—things like garlic and onions, which contain an important phytonutrient called ‘allium.’ There’s also ginger. Many of these examples of antioxidants or phytonutrients also come in pill form, but what we want to do is take a look at food first. An as example of why this is important, let’s think about that betacarotene that we talked about in the carrot. Many years ago, there was a research study that found that people who ate more betacarotene-rich foods, like carrots, had lower rates of developing lung cancer. However, when people were given betacarotene supplement, the researchers actually had to stop the study early, because they found that the participants who were current or former smokers taking the active betacarotene were actually at risk for developing lung cancer—the total opposite effect of what we were hoping for in that type of study. We know now that high-dose antioxidant supplements during certain types of cancer treatment can actually reduce the effectiveness of that cancer treatment. However, don’t give up your blueberries yet—getting antioxidants from foods doesn’t cause that same concern. The body knows how much to absorb and what nutrients your specific body needs at that current moment in time. So, eating as many blueberries as you want during cancer treatment is not going to be detrimental, like taking a high-dose antioxidant supplement could. That doesn’t mean that all supplements are not healthy. It’s important to think about a supplement as just that—a supplement to your diet. For example. omega-3 fatty acids are an essential fat that we have to eat, and they play a role in many things—everything from helping to reduce inflammation to having a healthy brain and healthy mind and cognition. There’s a variety of benefits. We get omega-3 fats from certain types of fish, but we can also get them from things like walnuts. Some people may choose to take a supplement, but you always want to run that by your doctor or your nutritionist first. Look to get those nutrients from your foods first. Now, some supplements might be necessary. For example, when you’re going through treatment, you may have low blood levels of certain nutrients, like magnesium, and in that case, you might need to take a supplement. Vitamin D is another example of a supplement that might be important to take. Vitamin D deficiency is very common, but it’s a blood test, so your doctor can check that out for you, and you can speak with your doctor and your nutritionist. Hopefully you’ve learned that eating foods first is the best approach to getting your vitamins, and as far as supplements go, check and see—it’s always important to ask questions. For more information and recipes for great, nutrient-rich foods, and tips on what vitamins you may want to choose or avoid, check out our website or download our app. On behalf of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, I’m Stacy Kennedy.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2284

Likes : 8

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Published Date : 2015-11-16T15:38:16.000Z

Learn more about our personalized approach to treatment and care for patients with breast cancer at at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Breast-Cancer-Treatment-Center.aspx. Dr. Tari King, Chief of Breast Surgery at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, discusses the importance of a team approach to treating breast cancer. Transcription: My name is Tari King. I’m a breast cancer surgeon, so my practice is devoted 100% to the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. I spend my time not only trying to provide patients with optimal care, but also trying to understand more about the biology of the disease, who’s at highest risk for getting breast cancer, and what are the ways that we can either treat it better or one day hopefully prevent breast cancer. When a woman is newly diagnosed with breast cancer, it’s a very anxiety-provoking time in her life, and it’s important for her to understand that breast cancer management comes in multiple different pieces, and in order for us to best advise her, we really do need to have all the information together at the time of our first visit. We really want to be able to put the whole picture together and really give her the best advice and then come to a treatment plan that best fits that patient’s needs. It’s very important when a woman comes in to discuss her breast cancer diagnosis that she does have some companionship—whether it’s a family member, caregiver, friend, sibling… That’s a lot of information to absorb at that first visit, and it’s helpful to have somebody else there listening also. I really try to break things down into as simple of terms and simple of topics as we can. I draw a lot of pictures. I tell them that they're going to be learning Breast 101 as we explain their diagnosis, and just to feel like they've received the information that they need to feel comfortable with the choices that they need to make. I’m frequently asked by my patients why they should choose one hospital over another or one doctor over another when they're making decisions about where to receive their treatment for breast cancer. I’ve been fortunate, because I’ve always worked in comprehensive cancer centers, where I can honestly tell a woman that the reason to come to a center like Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center is that everybody here, everybody that you will encounter, everybody that’s involved in your care focuses specifically on breast cancer. Being able to focus on breast cancer allows us to gain a much deeper understanding and really allows us to tailor our therapies towards that individual much more than just a one-size-fits-all approach. So, I was very excited about the opportunity to come here and join the clinical enterprise and also bring my experience and expertise to this community and see how we can work together to better the lives of the breast cancer patients who are treated here.
    

Channel Title : Debra Bennett

Views : 272

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Published Date : 2012-04-26T19:56:48.000Z

I recently was invited to tour the new Yawkey Center for Cancer Care at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. It was an amazing place! The care that was given to every detail, as well as seeing a dream like a project this size come to fruition was inspiring. It warmed my heart to know the patients would be surrounded by so much beauty as they receive care and heal. This is a little slideshow I put together of the photos from my visit. Enjoy! To learn more about the core harmony™ Boston Marathon® Jimmy Fund Walk Team visit: www.coreharmony.com/Giving.html. We welcome walkers & virtual walkers worldwide to our team.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 336

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2016-11-22T21:58:57.000Z

Kenneth C. Anderson, MD, of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, talks about becoming the 2017 President of the American Society of Hematology (ASH) and research to be presented at the 58th annual ASH meeting in San Diego.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2711

Likes : 7

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2012-04-30T14:28:33.000Z

Dr. David A. Barbie is a thoracic cancer physician who treats lung cancer patients at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center. A focus of his research is to develop new drugs that target specific gene mutations associated with lung cancer. Learn more about how Dana-Farber's physicians treat lung cancer at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Thoracic-Cancer-Treatment-Center.aspx
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2435

Likes : 3

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2012-04-09T18:36:33.000Z

Dr. Richard Stone, director of the leukemia program, discusses his work and describes Dana-Farber's intensity of focus on both clinical care and research. Learn more about how Dana-Farber's physicians treat leukemia at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Hematologic-Oncology-Treatment-Center.aspx.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 722

Likes : 1

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-11-07T17:47:06.000Z

Dana-Farber neuro-oncologist Dr. David Reardon talks with his patient, Dr. Michael Thompson about his cancer diagnosis, treatment and care on the 2013 WEEI/NESN Jimmy Fund Radio-Telethon
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1896

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2011-05-06T21:58:16.000Z

After years of trying to have a baby, mother-to-be Rebecca Byrne was diagnosed with breast cancer. Dana-Farber's Dr. Ann Partridge fulfilled Rebecca's dream of motherhood with treatment options that saved both mother and baby.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 246

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-11-07T15:44:04.000Z

William G. Kaelin Jr., MD, Professor of Medicine, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, explains how genetic anomalies lead to cancer and how Dana-Farber’s scientists are uniquely positioned to develop novel agents to target these mutations.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1612

Likes : 3

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2012-05-09T17:35:08.000Z

As Director of the Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Outcomes Clinic, Dr. Manley works with pediatric cancer survivors (and families) to help them understand the side effects of cancer treatment. Dr. Manley emphasizes the importance in treating the patient, not just the cancer. Access to diverse professionals, and cutting-edge research and technology makes cancer care at Dana-Farber top-notch. Learn more about the clinical services available to survivors of childhood cancer: http://www.dana-farber.org/Pediatric-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Pediatric-Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Clinical-Services-for-Survivors-of-Childhood-Cancer.aspx
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 8633

Likes : 22

DisLikes : 5

Published Date : 2012-02-24T21:53:55.000Z

Boston's South Station crowd got a "sweet" surprise on February 24: One hundred dancers performed a spirited routine to the beloved Boston Red Sox's unofficial anthem, "Sweet Caroline," celebrating the Jimmy Fund's 7th annual Rally Against Cancer. Learn more about the Rally Against Cancer: http://www.rallyagainstcancer.org
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1051

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2016-02-05T17:30:29.000Z

Matthew Davids, MD, discusses CAR T-cell therapy, how it is used, and how it can benefit patients with blood cancers. This video clip was originally recorded as part of a live video webchat hosted by Dana-Farber and originally recorded on Jan. 26, 2016. Watch the full webchat here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=djsyxyMkfOA
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 932

Likes : 6

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-06-06T21:21:17.000Z

Dana-Farber genetic counselors, Sam Stickevers, LGC, and Sarah Cochrane, LGC, give an overview of the genetics of Lynch syndrome, genetic testing and questions surrounding test results for Lynch syndrome.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1060

Likes : 5

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2016-12-01T21:06:09.000Z

Nancy Lin, MD, and Geoffrey Shapiro, MD, PhD, explain research and treatment in triple negative breast cancer to attendees at the fifth annual metastatic breast cancer forum for patients and families, held at Dana-Farber on September 24, 2016. Learn more about Dana=Farber’s program for patients with metastatic breast cancer at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Breast-Cancer-Treatment-Center/Metastatic-Breast-Cancer-Expertise.aspx
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1625

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2015-02-12T14:12:11.000Z

To read more about how Dana-Farber's immunotherapy discovery is helping Barry beat lung cancer, visit http://www.discovercarebelieve.org/ Transcription: Barry: Well, I had pain in my neck, and I went to the doctor, and he said, “It looks like you have some infection, so let’s monitor for about a week and it should be gone.” So, the long and the short of it is, by the end of the next week, I was diagnosed with stage 3 lung cancer. So, you know—hey, what can I say? Speaker 2: What did you say? Speaker 3: Yeah! What kind of went through your head? Barry: Well, I wasn’t afraid. I didn’t think I was going to die. I have a relationship with God, and I felt like God told me, “You know what? I want you to have a testimony.” So, I started treatment, and after I went through radiation and I went through chemotherapy—and those treatments weren’t working—I went back to my primary physician and I said, “You know, I’d like to see a lung cancer specialist,” and he said, “Well, you get a second opinion, and that person is at Dana-Farber. Can I make an appointment?” I said, “Yes.” Speaker 3: What have been some of your most memorable moments at Dana-Farber? Barry: When I was first diagnosed, they told me I had 2 years to live. See, you want to be at a place where they have hope, and they're going to fight as hard as you fight. They treat everyone there as if there’s every possibility in the world that they can heal you, that they can cure you, that they can bring you through your situation. Speaker 2: So, for people that are watching right now, why Jimmy Fund? Why help? Barry: It’s amazing to see so many people affected by cancer, but it’s also amazing to see how many people that are affected are living good, are living well, are being cured from cancer. Speaker 2: So Barry, will you get on the bike and show us what that good work at Dana-Farber has got you? Barry: Sure. Speaker 2: Now, you couldn’t walk last year, and now you're hopping on this bike. Barry: Well, since you're videotaping, I will put my helmet on! So, hopefully we’ll raise enough money that they can eliminate it altogether, you know?
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 938

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2017-01-19T21:45:26.000Z

Dr. Catherine Wu comments on her latest research involving chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) including the impact of mutated SF3B1 on CLL-associated pathways.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 65191

Likes : 139

DisLikes : 28

Published Date : 2013-03-11T18:20:35.000Z

Starting chemotherapy treatment can feel scary and overwhelming. Hear from Joanna, a breast cancer patient, who describes her initial fears and talks about what the experience of receiving chemotherapy was actually like at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Learn more about the chemotherapy process at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Chemotherapy.aspx. Transcription: Joanna: My name is Joanna, and I was diagnosed with breast cancer in May of 2012. When you first learn that you have to have chemotherapy, it really solidifies the fact that you have invasive cancer. Most of all, I was afraid of how it was going to make me feel and whether I was going to feel up to taking care of my daughter. Dr. Mayer:How are you feeling? Joanna:I’m feeling good. Everyday I feel a little bit stronger, and I feel like I’m definitely recovering from the surgery. Dr. Mayer:Terrific. We’re going to start your treatment today. We’re going to talk today about how one gets chemotherapy and what the schedule is like. We’re going to see you every other week. You’ll get your treatments here, and then you’ll be at home the rest of the time, recovering and living your regular life. When you go over to infusion, you’ll meet your infusion nurse, and she’s going to take really good care of you. She’s going to watch you carefully, make sure you have everything that you need during your treatment. While you’re there… Joanna: Dr. Mayer did a really good job explaining the process of chemotherapy and all of the potential side effects. Leading up to my first infusion, I was really afraid. I think the scariest part about chemotherapy—and the first session for sure is the scariest part—but it’s just the unknown. All you know about chemotherapy is what you've heard, what other people’s experiences are. Everyone reacts differently, so it’s just so unknown how you're going to react to the chemotherapy, which makes it extremely scary. Missy:Joanna? Joanna:Hi. Missy:Hi, my name is Missy. Joanna:Nice to meet you. Missy:Nice to meet you. I’m going to be your infusion nurse. Joanna:OK. Missy:We’ll run through what to expect while you're here. When you come for a chemotherapy infusion treatment, you will always have blood work first, either here or on the second floor. You'll then see a provider, nurse practitioner, or physician, and then you'll come to the infusion side with the nurses over here. Joanna:OK. Missy:So, first of all, your first stop is always… Joanna:Missy was great. She sat with me and explained everything that was happening, any potential side effects that I might feel during and after the infusion. She definitely took the time to get to know me. I felt like I was in excellent hands with both my doctor as well as Missy and the other infusion nurses that provide care. Missy:Any questions? Joanna:So, you’ll send me home with medications for any potential side effects I might have? Missy:Yes. We’ll definitely cover you. We’ll give you a bunch of anti-nausea medications while you’re here, and then we’ll send you home with some, just in case you need anything. Joanna:The infusion area at Dana-Farber is a beautiful space. It’s really well lit. It’s very welcome. There are ceiling-to-floor windows with great views of the city of Boston. You have a semi-private area where you receive your infusion. The chairs are really comfortable. You can get a massage. You can recline your chair. There are people who are volunteers coming around providing hand massages. There’s food and drinks available to you. They have televisions in each infusion area. They provide warm blankets. So, it’s a really comfortable and welcoming space. The chemotherapy process was much better than I had expected. My advice to anyone who is starting chemotherapy would be to acknowledge that it is a scary process, first of all, and that with each infusion it gets much easier, and to accept help from family and friends who are there and want to offer their help to you during a really difficult time.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2278

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2010-05-03T20:11:54.000Z

Cancer survivors can experience short- and long-term health challenges as a result of their treatment. Rich Boyajian, a leukemia survivor and nurse practitioner, explains the importance of a treatment summary and aftercare plan to help survivors and their doctors be better prepared. Interview conducted by Dr. Ken Miller, former director of the Adult Survivorship Program at Dana-Farber. More: http://www.dana-farber.org/pat/surviving/adult-onset/living-well/2-establishing-a-care-plan/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2316

Likes : 3

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2011-09-08T17:06:48.000Z

James Bradner, MD, and Constantine Mitsiades, MD, explain their recent study to inhibit the improper activation of the regulatory protein MYC using the molecule JQ1 and what the findings could mean for patients with multiple myeloma. Read more: http://www.dana-farber.org/Newsroom/News-Releases/Novel-approach-scores-first-success-against-elusive-cancer-gene.aspx

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