Dana Farber Cancer Institute....!

About 20 results out of 256507 (0.23 seconds)
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2

Likes : 1

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-12-13T17:22:43.000Z

Brian M. Wolpin, MD, MPH Medical Oncology, Gastrointestinal Cancer, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1

Likes : 0

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-12-13T17:19:53.000Z

Osama Rahma, MD Medical Oncology, Gastrointestinal Cancer, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 3

Likes : 0

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-12-13T17:14:28.000Z

Peter C. Enzinger, MD Medical Oncologist, Gastrointestinal Cancer, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 5028

Likes : 15

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2014-02-19T18:13:04.000Z

This introduction to Dana-Farber provides a look at the history of the Institute, explores the core values that underlie its work, and highlights some of the ways employees take an active part in fundraising and volunteering. Learn more about working at Dana-Farber: http://www.dana-farber.org/abo/working/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 6650

Likes : 53

DisLikes : 6

Published Date : 2018-02-02T21:15:45.000Z

Kenneth Anderson, MD, envisions the future of multiple myeloma treatment with novel therapies, including proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs, as well as therapies for smoldering disease. Learn more about the Multiple Myeloma Program at Dana-Farber. https://www.dana-farber.org/multiple-myeloma-program/ View more presentations from the 2017 Multiple Myeloma patient Education Symposium at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. http://www.dana-farber.org/health-library/videos/multiple-myeloma-patient-symposium-video-presentations/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 252

Likes : 1

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-11-07T15:19:08.000Z

Laurie H. Glimcher, MD, Dana-Farber’s President and CEO, gives Visiting Committee members an update on the excellent progress in research and care initiatives at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2108

Likes : 6

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2015-09-02T17:08:37.000Z

Christina Dixon, who was 22 when diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma, looks back on her experience coming to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute as a young adult. Learn more about Dana-Farber's Young Adult Program by visiting www.dana-farber.org/youngadults. Music: "Tell Me" by Alialujah Choir Transcription: When I came to Dana-Farber for the first time, it was really scary. I was 22 and had just found out about the diagnosis, and I really didn’t know what to expect. Once I found out about my diagnosis, it was actually just a day before I came in and met Dr. Fischer. When I came in for my first infusion appointment, I started out by going to lab services, where they checked me in and gave me schedule for what I would be doing for the day, and walked me through exactly where I would need to go and who I would be meeting with. I was really impressed with how organized everything was, but also how nice and caring everyone was. When I met Kerry for the first time, I walked in and she had a big smile on her face and welcomed me and told me exactly where I was going to be going. I just immediately felt like she was going to be a really important person in my treatment. Kerry was very patient with me and explained to me exactly what I would be doing. She took my initial labs, and I found out that she would be my infusion nurse for most of my treatments. Kerry really inspired me to never lose my sense of humor regardless of the circumstances, and I’ll never forget how she was just always very positive. So, when I met Dr. Fischer, I sat down with him and we talked through what he had seen from the biopsy and what he believed was the best treatment for my cancer. He was very, very patient with me, and I walked in with a lot of questions, and he went through each question with me and took time to help me understand what the side effects would be and what to expect. I had a lot of confidence in both Dana-Farber and specifically Dr. Fischer as my doctor. He would stop by every chemo appointment and ask how I was doing and make sure if there that was really bothering me, he would help me figure out a solution to it. In a very scary time, they were able to make me feel much more secure. The more I came, the more I got to know them and they got to know me, and as they realized what kind of personality I have, they were able to give me advice that was very effective and that was specific to my personality type. When I transitioned to surveillance, it was the most difficult experience of my life, and I wasn’t expecting that. Because they knew me, they were able to steer me in the right direction in terms of finding resources, whether it was talking to social workers or getting involved with the young adult program, and that ended up being a really important of my cancer experience. I met with a couple of different people in the program—specifically Karen [Faciano 03:01], who helped me find a place where I was able to contribute and meet other young adults. I found about the annual conference and attended that, and through some of the workshops met other young adults. For the first time, I realized that the things that I was struggling with were completely normal and that I wasn’t the only one who felt isolated because of cancer. At the time, Karen and the young adult team—they were developing the online platform to help young adults at Dana-Farber connect to each other. I was able to attend the focus groups on that and help in designing the website, and that was really meaningful to be a part of that. At the end of treatment, I was really scared, because I was afraid that the support I had had during treatment was going to end, and I quickly realized that my care team here for me whenever I needed any support or help. I immediately began to feel a sense of freedom, that I could go out and do the things that I was afraid the cancer would take away from me.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 7659

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2011-04-15T14:19:35.000Z

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute's Yawkey Center offers many amenities to help ease the burden of cancer treatment on patients and families. The Yawkey Center was built with input from patients, who worked closely with Dana-Farber's staff to design some of the most important features. More: http://www.dana-farber.org/yawkey
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1983

Likes : 10

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2015-05-01T17:34:06.000Z

The Profile research study is creating one of the largest databases of genetic abnormalities in cancer. More than 15,000 tumor samples have been genetically sequenced and the results are beginning to shed more light on just what makes certain cancers tick. In this video, scientists show how genetic testing in cancer happens -- from tumor sample collection to data analysis -- and talk about the promise that the technology holds for cancer research and care. More information about Profile — a collaboration between Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital — is at Http://www.dana-farber.org/Profile. Transcription: Speaker 1: Just dropping off some specimens. Speaker 2: Thank you. Reporter: It’s here in the pathology lab where tumor samples are brought in for testing. The samples are from cancer patients who have consented to be part of the Profile Project, a large research study to help speed the development of personalized cancer care with precision treatments. Dr. William Hahn is the deputy chief scientific officer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He helps lead the joint project with Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Hahn: We’re really excited about it, because it really represents our first foray into using molecular techniques to understand cancers, rather than anatomical criteria, and that means that all of the knowledge we’ve learned over the last 30 or 40 years about what makes cancers tick, we can now try to get at the basis of that within the DNA of a tumor. Reporter: To get the DNA, technologists isolate a sample from the tumor, and then it’s put on a slide to be checked by pathologists for quality. Dr. Neil Lindeman is the direct of the Center for Advanced Molecular Diagnostics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where the tumor samples are then processed. Dr. Lindeman: What we’re trying to do is we’re trying to understand the genetic causes of cancers—what genes specifically are causing what cancer and how it behaves in each patient, one at at a time. And we’re using a very sophisticated and high-throughput technology that enables us to test for a lot of different changes—hundreds at once—in a lot of different patients. Reporter: That sophisticated technology allows scientists to scan tumor DNA for cancer-related abnormalities in more than 300 genes. Dr. Lindeman: This is the instrument that we use to fragment DNA… Reporter: One of the first steps in the process is breaking up the DNA into small fragments using a sonicator. Dr. Lindeman: To the principle of sonication is sound waves—ultrasound—setting up vibrations that sheer the DNA, and by tuning the sonicator to the right frequency, you can generate fragments that are roughly equal size. Reporter: Those DNA fragments are then placed into a sequencer, which uses light signals and a computer to read each letter of the DNA code and look for cancer-related changes. Dr. Hahn: What modern sequencers do is instead of doing this in a one-base-at-a-time linear manner, they sequence thousands or hundreds of thousands of pieces of DNA in a parallel manner, and then we reassemble all of that data to come up with the overall sequence. So, one way to think about this is instead of doing things one after another after another, we’re doing a million processes all at once and then taking that data and combining it at the end. Reporter: With the sequencing complete, the data are interpreted by a team of cancer investigators. The goal is to identify the specific cause of the patient’s cancer and then determine which treatment will be the most effective. Now that the project has logged more than 5,000 tumor profiles, researchers are starting to look for leads to new cancer discoveries. Dr. Lindeman: Well, I’d like to see this being done for everybody routinely continuing, and I’d like to see this transition from being a research project to a clinical project. I think results should be available in the medical record, and physicians taking care of patients should be able to see these results and act on them. Dr. Hahn: So, in the past, when we’ve looked at cancers using the best tools that we had, it was largely looking at a black box. We could discern the edges and feel a little bit about what it was that cancer might be, but we had know way of comprehensively interrogating exactly what makes up cancer. This is the first step to being able to take away that black box and really understand what it is that makes a cancer tick.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 419

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-05-11T16:34:20.000Z

The Center for Spiritual Care at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute offers emotional, religious, and spiritual support to patients of all ages, their families, and Dana-Farber employees before, during, and after treatment. For more information, please contact 617.632.5778 (office), 617.632.3352 (page on-call chaplain), or speak to your medical team. We look forward to meeting you. Music: Addie Mahmassani
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 181

Likes : 3

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-03-09T22:08:11.000Z

Mark Sullivan's daughter, Kaylee, was a pediatric patient at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute before her death. In this video, Mark shares his story, his experience with grief, and what helped him in the early weeks of his bereavement.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 28098

Likes : 93

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2007-11-12T14:43:39.000Z

As they watched each other across Jimmy Fund Way, patients in the Jimmy Fund Clinic and ironworkers constructing a new Dana-Farber building formed a silent but powerful connection. Based on a true story.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 4668

Likes : 35

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2011-11-29T14:10:28.000Z

Siddartha Mukherjee, MD, PhD, author of "The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer," talks about the role of Dana-Farber in the story of cancer research and explains how Sidney Farber, MD, "the father of chemotherapy," helped move conversation about cancer from a private to a public arena.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 82671

Likes : 331

DisLikes : 6

Published Date : 2015-06-18T14:00:48.000Z

How does immunotherapy fight cancer? If you take the brakes off the immune system, you can unleash an attack on cancer cells. That's the theory behind PD-1/PD-L1, a vitally important immunotherapy discovery illustrated in this video. You can learn more about the PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors and how Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is using immunotherapy here: http://www.dana-farber.org/Newsroom/P... Transcription: Hello, and welcome to Dana-Farber Science Illustrated. Today, we’re going to be taking a closer look at how scientists use drug agents to help our immune system discover cancerous cells. Our bodies are made up of trillions of cells, which work together to keep us healthy. One group of white blood cells, known as T-cells, act as our own, personal guards. They patrol our bodies relentlessly for signs of infection or other diseases and attack them aggressively. While on patrol, T-cells use specialized protein receptors on their surface to latch onto cells and fully inspect them for signs that they may be cancerous. Once they’ve made a confirmation, T-cells summon an attack on diseased cells. However, sometimes the T-cells aren’t able to recognize the bad cancer cells, and they never attack. Scientists have found that many cancer cells carry proteins that act like masks and allow them to blend in with healthy cells. One protein in particular that cancer cells use for this deception is called PD-L1. When T-cells use their PD-1 protein to latch onto cancer cells’ PD-L1 protein, they’re fooled into thinking that cancerous cells are actually healthy ones. They then leave the cancer cells alone and allow them to go on multiplying in the body. Scientists realized that if they could find a way to block PD-L1 on cancer cells, then the T-cells could unleash an attack on them. This discovery led to the development of drugs made from natural, human antibodies that block PD-1/PD-L1 protein interaction. The T-cells are then able to recognize the cancer cells and begin their attack. Thank you for joining us on this brief look at the exciting field of Immunotherapy. For more information, visit discovercarebelieve.org. And, until next time, this has been Dana-Farber Science Illustrated.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 8

Likes : 0

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-12-12T20:15:10.000Z

Ursula A. Matulonis, MD, describes her approach to caring for women with gynecologic cancer. To learn more about the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, visit: http://www.dana-farber.org/susan-f-smith-center-for-womens-cancers/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 278

Likes : 1

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-11-19T15:48:17.000Z

On Friday, November 16, 2018, the Executive Council for the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute held its tenth annual Beyond Boston Luncheon. Watch these highlights to hear speakers educate guests on the latest advances in research and clinical care. The funds raised at the Luncheon are instrumental in enabling physician-researchers at the Susan F. Smith Center to continue their groundbreaking work in the discovery and treatment of women’s cancers. Learn more about how you can make a difference by visiting www.susanfsmith.org
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 13396

Likes : 31

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2011-05-11T20:57:06.000Z

In this video, Dr. Beth Overmoyer from Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center in Boston outlines the typical symptoms and standard form of treatment for inflammatory breast cancer (IBC). Learn more about Dana-Farber's inflammatory breast cancer program: http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Breast-Cancer-Treatment-Center/Inflammatory-Breast-Cancer-Program.aspx
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 3884

Likes : 24

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2014-12-29T17:32:58.000Z

Nikhil C. Munshi, MD, Director of Basic and Correlative Science, and professor of medicine, the Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Cancer and LeBow Institute for Myeloma Therapeutics at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, discusses diagnosis and risk assessment in multiple myeloma. Learn more about Dana-Farber's research and treatment for multiple myeloma at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Hematologic-Oncology-Treatment-Center/Multiple-Myeloma-Program.aspx.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 7

Likes : 0

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-12-13T15:05:03.000Z

At the annual Forum for Young Women with Breast Cancer, sponsored by the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers and held at Dana-Farber on October 12, Christopher Recklitis, PhD, assistant professor of pediatrics at Harvard Medical School and president of the Perini Family Survivors' Center at Dana-Farber, spoke about life after breast cancer treatment. He addressed the challenges women face as breast cancer survivors and ways they can maintain their mental and physical health. To learn more, visit: www.danafarber.org/YoungWomenBreastCancer.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 623

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-06-14T21:14:26.000Z

Judy Garber, MD, MPH, Director of the Center for Cancer Genetics and Prevention, describes Li-Fraumeni syndrome, a hereditary disorder that increases the risk of developing several types of cancer, and ways that individuals and families can manage this diagnosis. For more information, visit: http://www.dana-farber.org/cancergenetics
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 6231

Likes : 29

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2014-12-23T13:14:39.000Z

Advice to consider after being diagnosed with metastatic breast cancer. Eric Winer, MD, director of the Breast Oncology Program at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers at Dana-Farber, shares his insight.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 442

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-06-27T15:03:55.000Z

Pioneers. Leaders. Visionaries. A relentless pursuit of discovery, improved outcomes, and comprehensive care for young patients makes Dana-Farber/Boston Children’s Cancer and Blood Disorders Center a top-ranked pediatric cancer center in the United States. Dana-Farber/Boston Children's has been ranked #1 or #2 for pediatric cancer 9 times since 2008 by U.S. News & World Report.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1502

Likes : 6

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2016-11-11T22:49:23.000Z

Jeffrey Meyerhardt, MD, MPH, Clinical Director of Dana-Farber's Gastrointestinal Cancer Center, discusses research on the relationship between a healthy lifestyle and cancer risk for patients with Lynch syndrome and the general public.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 358

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2015-12-22T14:28:36.000Z

Mark Pomerantz, MD, of Dana-Farber's Lank Center for Genitourinary Oncology, discusses how hormone therapy is used to treat prostate cancer.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 17963

Likes : 63

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2013-05-21T19:47:48.000Z

Watch Boston's WCVB TV Channel 5 reporter Kelley Tuthill, a breast cancer survivor treated at Dana-Farber's Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers, share her tips for selecting a wig and wearing it with confidence. Learn how to wear a wig, keep it in place, find the right look, and more. Find more tips and products to help you cope with the physical effects of cancer treatment at Dana-Farber's Friends' Place: http://www.dana-farber.org/FriendsPlace Learn more about our experts and clinical care at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers: http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Susan-F--Smith-Center-for-Women-s-Cancers.aspx
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 4818

Likes : 47

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2014-04-17T12:24:23.000Z

Radio broadcast May 22, 1948 During his treatment for cancer in the late 1940s, "Jimmy" longed for a television set so he could watch his favorite baseball team — the Boston Braves. His wish was granted after Ralph Edwards interviewed him on the national "Truth or Consequences" radio show on May 22, 1948. During the broadcast, Edwards spoke to the young cancer patient from his Hollywood studio as Braves players crowded into Jimmy's hospital room. The show ended with a plea for listeners to send donations so Jimmy could get his TV set. Not only did he get his wish, but more than $200,000 was collected and the Jimmy Fund was born.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 28

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-12-12T17:40:55.000Z

At the annual Forum for Young Women with Breast Cancer, sponsored by the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers and held at Dana-Farber on October 12, Shoshana Rosenberg, ScD, MPH, assistant professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and assistant professor of medical oncology at Dana-Farber, discussed research development in the field of breast oncology. To learn more, visit: www.dana-farber.org/YoungWomenBreastCancer.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 7497

Likes : 21

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2013-08-08T17:03:29.000Z

In this video, Dr. Eric Winer, Director of the Breast Oncology Program and one of the leaders of the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers at Dana-Farber, shares the definition of DCIS, weighs in on whether or not DCIS is considered cancer, and describes treatment options for women with DCIS. Learn more about how Dana-Farber's physicians treat breast cancer at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Breast-Cancer-Treatment-Center.aspx. at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Breast-Cancer-Treatment-Center.aspx. Transcription: Dr. Winer: DCIS stands for ‘Ductal Carcinoma In Situ.’ Before the widespread use of screening mammography, DCIS was a very, very infrequent diagnosis. In most cases, it is found on a mammogram, oftentimes because there are calcifications that are seen, and I think it’s important that women understand that not all calcifications are DCIS—in fact, most calcifications are not—but there are certain calcifications on the mammogram that can make it much more likely that DCIS will be there. These are true cancer cells, but they are sitting entirely within the ducts, and they do not have the ability to spread to other parts of the body, because they are walled in within the ducts system. Text: Is DCIS cancer? Dr. Winer: So, there’s been discussion recently about whether DCIS—Ductal Carcinoma In Situ—should be called ‘cancer’ at all. In my mind, it’s not what we call it; it’s what it is and having that conversation with a patient that’s most critical. Those who argue that we shouldn’t call it ‘cancer’ say that the name ‘cancer’ in and of itself creates such fear that it paralyzes women, and they're not able to make the best possible decisions. Those that say that it should be called ‘cancer’ recognize the fact that these are true cancer cells, and there’s the potential that this can develop into an invasive cancer. From my standpoint, what’s important is that a woman with DCIS understands that her chance of dying from DCIS is almost zero, and that the reason that DCIS is important is that if the DCIS is untreated, it has the potential to lead to a diagnosis of invasive breast cancer. And so, what this is all about is conversations between doctors and patients and not letting the terminology use frighten, but instead to be guided by what the real facts are. Text: How is DCIS treated? Dr. Winer: We treat DCIS largely prevent the development of invasive breast cancer, and treatment typically includes surgery and sometimes radiation and sometimes hormonal therapy. The surgery that’s done is typically either a lumpectomy or occasionally a mastectomy. There are women with DCIS who need to undergo a mastectomy if, in fact, the DCIS is very extensive and the surgeon is unable to remove it entirely with a lumpectomy. For women who can have a lumpectomy—and that means that the entire area of DCIS is removed—in general, radiation is given after a lumpectomy; although, there are some studies that have tried to eliminate radiation, and there’s a great deal of debate about who should and who shouldn’t receive radiation after a diagnosis of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ. Occasionally—or perhaps more than occasionally—the drug is used as well to prevent a recurrence of DCIS in the breast, but many women decide that the side effects associated with any kind of drug are really too troublesome to make it worthwhile to take it in this setting, because it’s important to remember that DCIS in and of itself is not life threatening. The reason we treat it, once again, is to prevent the diagnosis of invasive breast cancer, so women who have a diagnosis of DCIS should recognize that their chance of going and doing well after treatment from DCIS is extraordinarily high.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 4818

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2014-01-23T17:41:37.000Z

For more information on Barrett's Esophagus treatment visit http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Gastrointestinal-Cancer-Treatment-Center/Center-for-Esophageal-and-Gastric-Cancer.aspx Barrett's esophagus is a pre-malignant condition that can lead to esophageal cancer. Specialists, such as Dr. Peter Enzinger, at the Center for Esophageal and Gastric Cancer at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center monitor and treat patients with this condition through a variety of treatment options, effectively reducing their future cancer risk for developing esophageal cancer. Transcription: Barrett’s Esophagus is a pre-cancer. It’s amazing how many Americans actually have this. It is estimated that approximately 1 in 6 Americans have reflux symptoms at least weekly, and about 10% of these Americans will have Barrett’s Esophagus. The older you are, the higher your risk is for developing this, and this particular pre-cancer can actually lead to esophageal cancer. We at the center are experts in taking care of Barrett’s Esophagus, and we have specialists who not only can monitor this premalignant condition, but can also treat it and can actually prevent it from turning into cancer. We have innovative techniques in which we can actually remove the cancer from the inside of the esophagus. This can be done with various measures, such as ablation therapies, but we can also give medications that can reduce the incidence of reflux and can reduce the cancer risk in that fashion.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 12

Likes : 0

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-12-13T14:29:32.000Z

At the annual Forum for Young Women with Breast Cancer, sponsored by the Susan F. Smith Center for Women’s Cancers and held at Dana-Farber on October 12, seven breast cancer clinicians answered questions from the audience. The panelists included Anna Weiss, MD; Eric Winer, MD; Philip Poorvu, MD; Laura Warren, MD; Jessica Erdmann-Sager, MD; Heather Parsons, MD; and Julie Salinger, MSW, LICSW. To learn more, visit: www.dana-farber.org/YoungWomenBreastCancer.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2860

Likes : 7

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-11-11T15:23:17.000Z

Dr. Eric Winer, director of Breast Oncology at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers, talks about the importance of getting to know patients and their preferences to make sure that each treatment plan is as personalized as possible. Learn more about how Dana-Farber treats breast cancer at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Breast-Cancer/How-We-Treat-Breast-Cancer.aspx
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 23710

Likes : 51

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2014-11-24T18:53:15.000Z

NBC News’ Tom Brokaw, who was diagnosed with multiple myeloma in August 2013, discusses his experience with cancer and shares advice for fellow patients. Transcription: Text:What does it mean to have cancer? Tom:It’s a life-changing experience, and it certainly was for me. It was a trial. At the same time, I was always confident that I would emerge OK, and I was fascinated by the treatment that I was going through, because it’s not math—it’s a lot of sophisticated guesswork that goes on here and getting the right cocktail of drugs and so on. I was not prepared for how uncertain it would be, I guess, as much as anything, and how there would be lows and highs along the way. Text:What were some of the challenges of your cancer treatment? Tom:No one said to me, “It’s going to really knock you on your backside,” because it’s bone and blood. I developed compression fractures in my spine and in my lower back, and I was confined to my house. I couldn’t walk. I couldn’t get out of bed. I wasn’t ready for that. I’m somebody who likes beginnings, middles, and ends—I want to know when things are going to end, so I can move on to the next. People kept saying, “A year from now you’ll be OK.” What does that mean if everything goes right? And then a couple of times during the year I got serious infections and had to be hospitalized under emergency conditions. Text:Why is a support team critical during treatment? Tom:I never broke down. I’ve lived a long time, and I’m a pretty tough guy. I’ve seen a lot of stuff around the world. I’ve been in wars and other things. So, I was mentally prepared, but I couldn’t have done it without my family. I couldn’t have done it without my wife, who is my pharmacist, sheriff, tough love, laughed at my jokes, got me out of bed—she was there for me. And then the family rallied around as well, so that’s also critically important. Text:What advice do you have for other cancer patients? Tom:Be careful of Google. Don’t go on and try to find about your cancer on Google, because it’s a wide range of stuff you can’t rely on. But with a couple of selective phone calls and going to a couple of sites, you can find out real information. In this cancer, for example, there was a woman by the name of Kathy Giusti, who was a… You probably know who she is. Interviewer:I know her very well. Tom:And right away people said, “You’ve got to go to Kathy Giusti, and you've got to talk to her. She’s got this great site called the ‘Multiple Myeloma Foundation for Research,’ and it’s clearinghouse—that’s reliable information. You can find out what’s going on. You don’t go to your doctor and say, “Kathy says I ought to do this,” but you have a better understanding of it at that point. And then talk to people who have had multiple myeloma. It turns out two of my friends were five or six years in, and I was able to call them and say, “OK, what am I in for here?” They said, “Every case is different, but here’s what we experienced.” And it’s everything from what your body goes through to dealing with insurance companies, frankly. You have to know all of that stuff. It becomes your whole universe, quite honestly. Text:How is your health today? Tom:I’m actually feeling good. The thing that I’m still working on is getting my physical reconditioning—as the therapist say—back in some shape. My legs lost a lot of muscle tone. I lost a lot of weight (which that was fine). I don’t have the cardio strength that I once did. I can’t run the way that I did and do other things, so I’m day by day trying to get in better physical condition and hope that that scrim through which I saw life of cancer is being lowered. I don’t think about it nearly as much as I used to.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 13019

Likes : 52

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2009-02-05T16:51:03.000Z

During construction of the Yawkey Center for Cancer Care, workers spray-painted the names of some of our young patients onto the building's steel beams. Today, some of those names are still visible in a specially created corner of the Yawkey Center. Read more: http://www.dana-farber.org/Newsroom/News-Releases/What-s-in-a-name--For-patients,-a-piece-of-history.aspx
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 3476

Likes : 15

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2014-04-24T16:29:25.000Z

For more information on Dana-Farber's Psychosocial Oncology Program, visit this webpage: http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Psychosocial-Oncology.aspx Slides for this presentation are available on Dana-Farber's Slideshare page: http://www.slideshare.net/DanaFarber/managing-chemobrain Cognitive effects of cancer and cancer treatment -- also known as chemobrain -- are widely recognized. Fremonta Meyer, MD, of Dana-Farber's Psychosocial Oncology Program, discusses the details of chemobrain and how to manage its symptoms.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 168

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-05-14T18:54:50.000Z

Founded in 1976, the Friends of Dana-Farber Cancer Institute have raised more than $34 million to fund powerful cancer research and patient care programs at Dana-Farber. Learn more about the Friends: http://www.dana-farber.org/how-you-can-help/get-involved/friends-of-dana-farber-cancer-institute/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 830

Likes : 10

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-06-06T21:39:41.000Z

Emily E. Biever, MS, RD, LDN, senior clinical dietician at Dana-Farber, lays out an integrative approach to nutrition to reduce the risk of cancer, and gives dietary recommendations specific to individuals with Lynch syndrome.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2355

Likes : 5

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-02-21T14:49:21.000Z

There are an estimated 12 million cancer survivors in the U.S. thanks to advances in cancer treatment. But the end of treatment is not the end of the cancer experience. The Adult Survivorship Program at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute helps manage issues related to surviving cancer and ensure the long-term health and quality of life for survivors of the disease. Dr. Ann Partridge, director of the program, describes why it's important to offer adult cancer survivors a comprehensive plan for living well beyond cancer. Find out more about survivorship at: http://www.dana-farber.org/For-Adult-Cancer-Survivors.aspx.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1574

Likes : 5

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2014-12-29T17:33:18.000Z

James Bond, a 22 year survivor of multiple myeloma, discusses the role that clinical research has played in his life. This presentation was originally given at the Multiple Myeloma Patient Education Symposium on Dec. 13, 2014 in Boston, MA. Learn more about Dana-Farber's research and treatment for multiple myeloma at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Hematologic-Oncology-Treatment-Center/Multiple-Myeloma-Program.aspx.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1233

Likes : 3

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-09-05T15:47:19.000Z

"I'm alive today because of the treatment I've gotten at Dana-Farber," says patient Maura Perkins. View this compelling video of how the unique Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers is helping Maura battle back against ovarian cancer.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 807

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-06-06T21:21:17.000Z

Dana-Farber genetic counselors, Sam Stickevers, LGC, and Sarah Cochrane, LGC, give an overview of the genetics of Lynch syndrome, genetic testing and questions surrounding test results for Lynch syndrome.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2688

Likes : 22

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2014-04-24T17:21:07.000Z

Slides for this presentation are available on Dana-Farber's Slideshare page: http://www.slideshare.net/DanaFarber/chemorelated-neuropathy-managing-this-nerve-wracking-problem Cindy Tofthagen, PhD, ARNP, an assistant professor of nursing at the University of South Florida in Tampa and a post-doctoral fellow at the University of Massachusetts and Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, talks about chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN), the risk factors of CIPN, and how to manage the condition. This presentation was originally given at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute on Aug. 6, 2013, and put on by Dana-Farber's Blum Resource Center.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1325

Likes : 6

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2013-11-11T15:14:18.000Z

Ovarian cancer used to be thought of as only one cancer, today there are many different subtypes. Ursula A. Matulonis, MD, medical director of the Gynecologic Oncology program at Dana-Farber's Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers, describes ovarian cancer symptoms and treatment options. To learn more about how Dana-Farber's physicians treat ovarian cancers, visit take a look at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Ovarian-Cancer.aspx
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 84

Likes : 2

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-09-06T13:55:34.000Z

Jeffrey S. Wisch, MD Medical Oncologist, Gastrointestinal Cancers, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2216

Likes : 9

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2014-01-06T22:30:39.000Z

Good nutrition is part of a healthy lifestyle, along with exercise, weight management, not smoking, and reducing stress. Good nutrition also plays a critical role during cancer treatment and needs to be an important part of your overall treatment plan. For more information, recipes, tips and to view additional videos, visit http://www.dana-farber.org/eatingwell. Transcription: I’m Stacy Kennedy, nutrition specialist for Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Welcome to Eating Well During Cancer. Today, I’d like to talk to you about the link between nutrition and cancer. Good nutrition can play a role and have an impact throughout the journey of cancer. Research has shown that eating a healthy diet along with regular exercise, weight management, not smoking cigarettes, and reducing stress can all help to lower your risk of developing certain types of cancers, promote feeling well during treatment, managing symptoms like fatigue or bowel changes, loss of appetite, and also help promote survivorship. We know that eating well can be a challenge during cancer treatment, but it’s so important and can have a very strong impact on everything from helping to increase your energy level to boosting your immune system. It’s important to work with a nutritionist who specializes in cancer treatment along your journey through cancer. At Dana-Farber we have a team of specialists ready to work with you and help customize the best diet for you during treatment, as well as beyond into survivorship. If you’re not a patient at Dana-Farber, or even if you are would like more information, tips, and recipes, we encourage you to visit our website or to download our free app. On behalf of the nutrition department at Dana-Farber, I’m Stacy Kennedy.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 3227

Likes : 13

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2010-05-03T21:29:02.000Z

Getting back to full strength can take some time after cancer treatment ends. Learn strategies to hep cancer survivors deal with fatigue from Dr. William Pirl of Massachusetts General Hospital. More: http://www.dana-farber.org/pat/surviving/adult-onset/living-well/4-fatigue/

YouAPI-1


Facebook Page Like Box ::