Dana Farber Cancer Institute....!

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Channel Title : Boston Children's Hospital

Views : 215

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Published Date : 2011-02-18T22:35:03.000Z

Lisa R. Diller, MD, Chief Medical Officer at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center, talks about what researchers at Dana-Farber/Boston Children's are doing to improve the treatment of childhood cancer.
    

Channel Title : Brigham and Women's Hospital

Views : 457

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Published Date : 2013-06-05T14:09:54.000Z

Patients at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital need thirty thousand units of blood each year. Blood donations are separated into three components: red blood cells, plasma, and platelets. A single blood donation can help as many as three patients! Our Blood Mobile makes blood donation more convenient for donors and helps spread awareness about its importance. Learn more about the Kraft Family Blood Donor Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Brigham and Women's Hospital, http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Patients_Visitors/blood-donation/blood-drives.aspx Read our HealthHub blog posts: Blood Donation: Taking it to the Streets: http://healthhub.brighamandwomens.org/blood-donation-taking-it-to-the-streets Need a Good Reason to Donate Blood?: http://healthhub.brighamandwomens.org/need-a-good-reason-to-donate-blood#more-1713
    

Channel Title : Boston Children's Hospital

Views : 1778

Likes : 5

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2011-05-13T19:40:53.000Z

Dana-Farber/Boston Children's Cancer and Blood Disorders Center is an integrated pediatric hematology and oncology program through Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Boston Children's Hospital. We offer, in one specialized program, the full spectrum of services that are needed for diagnosis, treatment and ongoing care of even the rarest and hard-to-treat conditions.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 5489

Likes : 17

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2014-02-19T18:13:04.000Z

This introduction to Dana-Farber provides a look at the history of the Institute, explores the core values that underlie its work, and highlights some of the ways employees take an active part in fundraising and volunteering. Learn more about working at Dana-Farber: http://www.dana-farber.org/abo/working/
    

Channel Title : Brigham and Women's Hospital

Views : 1542

Likes : 10

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Published Date : 2016-03-23T14:15:54.000Z

Tari A. King, MD, Chief of Breast Surgery, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center (DF/BWCC), describes improvements in surgical options for the management of breast cancer. Innovations include less extensive removal of lymph nodes combined with chemotherapy and radiation therapy to minimize lymphedema. Other advances include the use of radioactive seeds rather than wires or needles to identify breast lesions that require surgical treatment.The use of radioactive seeds to localize breast lesions also improves patient comfort and convenience. At DF/BWCC, women with breast cancer are treated by a multi-disciplinary team that includes breast cancer surgeons, breast cancer medical oncologists, and breast cancer radiation oncologists working together to develop personalized treatment plans for each patient. Learn more about breast cancer treatment at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women’s Cancer Center: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/breas... Read the Advances in Surgical Management of Breast Cancer video transcript at: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Depar...
    

Channel Title : Brigham and Women's Hospital

Views : 618

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2015-05-26T12:29:10.000Z

The Rapid Heme Panel really was developed by cancer specialists at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center. Jon Aster, MD, PhD discusses the new DNA-based test which relies on relatively new technology that analyzes the 95 genes which are among the most commonly mutated genes in blood cancers such as acute leukemias, myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms. The test is performed at the Center for Advanced Molecular Diagnostics, located at Brigham and Women’s Hospital. Before this test was available the only option was to order single gene tests, performed at outside laboratories. The turnaround time for the individual gene tests can take as long as two to three weeks. The rapid heme panel test provides more in-depth information across a much larger number of genes in less time. This enables clinicians to start therapy more quickly and to select the most appropriate therapies available. Learn more about the Center for Advanced Molecular Diagnostics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/Departments_and_Services/pathology/Services/CAMD/default.aspx?sub=3 Read the Rapid Heme Panel video transcript: http://www.brighamandwomens.org/bwhcancer/video-transcript/rapid-heme-panel-DFBWCC-video-transcript.aspx
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 67469

Likes : 153

DisLikes : 30

Published Date : 2013-03-11T18:20:35.000Z

Starting chemotherapy treatment can feel scary and overwhelming. Hear from Joanna, a breast cancer patient, who describes her initial fears and talks about what the experience of receiving chemotherapy was actually like at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Learn more about the chemotherapy process at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Chemotherapy.aspx. Transcription: Joanna: My name is Joanna, and I was diagnosed with breast cancer in May of 2012. When you first learn that you have to have chemotherapy, it really solidifies the fact that you have invasive cancer. Most of all, I was afraid of how it was going to make me feel and whether I was going to feel up to taking care of my daughter. Dr. Mayer:How are you feeling? Joanna:I’m feeling good. Everyday I feel a little bit stronger, and I feel like I’m definitely recovering from the surgery. Dr. Mayer:Terrific. We’re going to start your treatment today. We’re going to talk today about how one gets chemotherapy and what the schedule is like. We’re going to see you every other week. You’ll get your treatments here, and then you’ll be at home the rest of the time, recovering and living your regular life. When you go over to infusion, you’ll meet your infusion nurse, and she’s going to take really good care of you. She’s going to watch you carefully, make sure you have everything that you need during your treatment. While you’re there… Joanna: Dr. Mayer did a really good job explaining the process of chemotherapy and all of the potential side effects. Leading up to my first infusion, I was really afraid. I think the scariest part about chemotherapy—and the first session for sure is the scariest part—but it’s just the unknown. All you know about chemotherapy is what you've heard, what other people’s experiences are. Everyone reacts differently, so it’s just so unknown how you're going to react to the chemotherapy, which makes it extremely scary. Missy:Joanna? Joanna:Hi. Missy:Hi, my name is Missy. Joanna:Nice to meet you. Missy:Nice to meet you. I’m going to be your infusion nurse. Joanna:OK. Missy:We’ll run through what to expect while you're here. When you come for a chemotherapy infusion treatment, you will always have blood work first, either here or on the second floor. You'll then see a provider, nurse practitioner, or physician, and then you'll come to the infusion side with the nurses over here. Joanna:OK. Missy:So, first of all, your first stop is always… Joanna:Missy was great. She sat with me and explained everything that was happening, any potential side effects that I might feel during and after the infusion. She definitely took the time to get to know me. I felt like I was in excellent hands with both my doctor as well as Missy and the other infusion nurses that provide care. Missy:Any questions? Joanna:So, you’ll send me home with medications for any potential side effects I might have? Missy:Yes. We’ll definitely cover you. We’ll give you a bunch of anti-nausea medications while you’re here, and then we’ll send you home with some, just in case you need anything. Joanna:The infusion area at Dana-Farber is a beautiful space. It’s really well lit. It’s very welcome. There are ceiling-to-floor windows with great views of the city of Boston. You have a semi-private area where you receive your infusion. The chairs are really comfortable. You can get a massage. You can recline your chair. There are people who are volunteers coming around providing hand massages. There’s food and drinks available to you. They have televisions in each infusion area. They provide warm blankets. So, it’s a really comfortable and welcoming space. The chemotherapy process was much better than I had expected. My advice to anyone who is starting chemotherapy would be to acknowledge that it is a scary process, first of all, and that with each infusion it gets much easier, and to accept help from family and friends who are there and want to offer their help to you during a really difficult time.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 345

Likes : 1

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Published Date : 2017-11-07T15:19:08.000Z

Laurie H. Glimcher, MD, Dana-Farber’s President and CEO, gives Visiting Committee members an update on the excellent progress in research and care initiatives at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 8047

Likes : 6

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Published Date : 2011-04-15T14:19:35.000Z

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute's Yawkey Center offers many amenities to help ease the burden of cancer treatment on patients and families. The Yawkey Center was built with input from patients, who worked closely with Dana-Farber's staff to design some of the most important features. More: http://www.dana-farber.org/yawkey
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2298

Likes : 8

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Published Date : 2015-09-02T17:08:37.000Z

Christina Dixon, who was 22 when diagnosed with Hodgkin lymphoma, looks back on her experience coming to Dana-Farber Cancer Institute as a young adult. Learn more about Dana-Farber's Young Adult Program by visiting www.dana-farber.org/youngadults. Music: "Tell Me" by Alialujah Choir Transcription: When I came to Dana-Farber for the first time, it was really scary. I was 22 and had just found out about the diagnosis, and I really didn’t know what to expect. Once I found out about my diagnosis, it was actually just a day before I came in and met Dr. Fischer. When I came in for my first infusion appointment, I started out by going to lab services, where they checked me in and gave me schedule for what I would be doing for the day, and walked me through exactly where I would need to go and who I would be meeting with. I was really impressed with how organized everything was, but also how nice and caring everyone was. When I met Kerry for the first time, I walked in and she had a big smile on her face and welcomed me and told me exactly where I was going to be going. I just immediately felt like she was going to be a really important person in my treatment. Kerry was very patient with me and explained to me exactly what I would be doing. She took my initial labs, and I found out that she would be my infusion nurse for most of my treatments. Kerry really inspired me to never lose my sense of humor regardless of the circumstances, and I’ll never forget how she was just always very positive. So, when I met Dr. Fischer, I sat down with him and we talked through what he had seen from the biopsy and what he believed was the best treatment for my cancer. He was very, very patient with me, and I walked in with a lot of questions, and he went through each question with me and took time to help me understand what the side effects would be and what to expect. I had a lot of confidence in both Dana-Farber and specifically Dr. Fischer as my doctor. He would stop by every chemo appointment and ask how I was doing and make sure if there that was really bothering me, he would help me figure out a solution to it. In a very scary time, they were able to make me feel much more secure. The more I came, the more I got to know them and they got to know me, and as they realized what kind of personality I have, they were able to give me advice that was very effective and that was specific to my personality type. When I transitioned to surveillance, it was the most difficult experience of my life, and I wasn’t expecting that. Because they knew me, they were able to steer me in the right direction in terms of finding resources, whether it was talking to social workers or getting involved with the young adult program, and that ended up being a really important of my cancer experience. I met with a couple of different people in the program—specifically Karen [Faciano 03:01], who helped me find a place where I was able to contribute and meet other young adults. I found about the annual conference and attended that, and through some of the workshops met other young adults. For the first time, I realized that the things that I was struggling with were completely normal and that I wasn’t the only one who felt isolated because of cancer. At the time, Karen and the young adult team—they were developing the online platform to help young adults at Dana-Farber connect to each other. I was able to attend the focus groups on that and help in designing the website, and that was really meaningful to be a part of that. At the end of treatment, I was really scared, because I was afraid that the support I had had during treatment was going to end, and I quickly realized that my care team here for me whenever I needed any support or help. I immediately began to feel a sense of freedom, that I could go out and do the things that I was afraid the cancer would take away from me.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 4994

Likes : 41

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2011-11-29T14:10:28.000Z

Siddartha Mukherjee, MD, PhD, author of "The Emperor of All Maladies: A Biography of Cancer," talks about the role of Dana-Farber in the story of cancer research and explains how Sidney Farber, MD, "the father of chemotherapy," helped move conversation about cancer from a private to a public arena.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 28656

Likes : 94

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2007-11-12T14:43:39.000Z

As they watched each other across Jimmy Fund Way, patients in the Jimmy Fund Clinic and ironworkers constructing a new Dana-Farber building formed a silent but powerful connection. Based on a true story.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 259

Likes : 1

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Published Date : 2019-04-09T13:09:19.000Z

Over 300 local women business and community leaders attended the 2019 Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers Executive Council Breakfast on April 5, 2019, raising more than $250,000 for research at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. This annual breakfast presents the latest cutting-edge research and treatment being conducted at Dana-Farber to help eradicate women's cancers. Funds raised support the Smith Center's Innovation Fund for new research. Learn more about how you can make a difference by visiting https://www.dana-farber.org/susan-f-smith-center-for-womens-cancers/.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 22980

Likes : 71

DisLikes : 6

Published Date : 2018-07-31T18:09:54.000Z

What are the signs and symptoms of colon and rectal cancer? Dana-Farber's Jeffrey Meyerhardt, MD talks about symptoms, screening, and what you can do to prevent colon and rectal cancer. Learn more about the Colon and Rectal Cancer Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: http://www.dana-farber.org/colon-and-rectal-cancer-center/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1062

Likes : 12

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2019-05-07T17:11:43.000Z

In this video, Anne H. Gross, PhD, RN, senior vice president for Patient Care Services and chief nursing officer, a patient’s mother, and other members of the Nursing and Patient Care Services team discuss what relationship-based care means to them. Learn more about nursing at Dana-Farber at https://www.dana-farber.org/for-patients-and-families/care-and-treatment/nursing-and-patient-care/.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 10384

Likes : 43

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2018-10-23T18:06:23.000Z

Dana-Farber's Mark Pomerantz, MD, talks about the signs and symptoms of prostate cancer, including information about risk factors, PSA screening, and more. Learn more about the Genitourinary Cancer Treatment Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: https://www.dana-farber.org/genitourinary-cancer-treatment-center/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 4496

Likes : 15

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2018-08-28T18:08:50.000Z

Dana-Farber's Mark Awad, MD, PhD, talks about the signs and symptoms of lung cancer, as well as guidelines for lung cancer screening. Learn more about the Thoracic Cancer Treatment Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: https://www.dana-farber.org/thoracic-lung-cancer-treatment-center/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 10088

Likes : 43

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2014-09-22T14:05:37.000Z

For more more information about liposarcoma visit http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Sarcoma-and-Bone-Cancer-Treatment-Center.aspx George Demetri, MD, talks about symptoms and treatment options for the different types of liposarcoma.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 88948

Likes : 380

DisLikes : 9

Published Date : 2015-06-18T14:00:48.000Z

How does immunotherapy fight cancer? If you take the brakes off the immune system, you can unleash an attack on cancer cells. That's the theory behind PD-1/PD-L1, a vitally important immunotherapy discovery illustrated in this video. You can learn more about the PD-1/PD-L1 inhibitors and how Dana-Farber Cancer Institute is using immunotherapy here: http://www.dana-farber.org/Newsroom/P... Transcription: Hello, and welcome to Dana-Farber Science Illustrated. Today, we’re going to be taking a closer look at how scientists use drug agents to help our immune system discover cancerous cells. Our bodies are made up of trillions of cells, which work together to keep us healthy. One group of white blood cells, known as T-cells, act as our own, personal guards. They patrol our bodies relentlessly for signs of infection or other diseases and attack them aggressively. While on patrol, T-cells use specialized protein receptors on their surface to latch onto cells and fully inspect them for signs that they may be cancerous. Once they’ve made a confirmation, T-cells summon an attack on diseased cells. However, sometimes the T-cells aren’t able to recognize the bad cancer cells, and they never attack. Scientists have found that many cancer cells carry proteins that act like masks and allow them to blend in with healthy cells. One protein in particular that cancer cells use for this deception is called PD-L1. When T-cells use their PD-1 protein to latch onto cancer cells’ PD-L1 protein, they’re fooled into thinking that cancerous cells are actually healthy ones. They then leave the cancer cells alone and allow them to go on multiplying in the body. Scientists realized that if they could find a way to block PD-L1 on cancer cells, then the T-cells could unleash an attack on them. This discovery led to the development of drugs made from natural, human antibodies that block PD-1/PD-L1 protein interaction. The T-cells are then able to recognize the cancer cells and begin their attack. Thank you for joining us on this brief look at the exciting field of Immunotherapy. For more information, visit discovercarebelieve.org. And, until next time, this has been Dana-Farber Science Illustrated.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2190

Likes : 12

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Published Date : 2015-05-01T17:34:06.000Z

The Profile research study is creating one of the largest databases of genetic abnormalities in cancer. More than 15,000 tumor samples have been genetically sequenced and the results are beginning to shed more light on just what makes certain cancers tick. In this video, scientists show how genetic testing in cancer happens -- from tumor sample collection to data analysis -- and talk about the promise that the technology holds for cancer research and care. More information about Profile — a collaboration between Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Brigham and Women's Hospital and Boston Children's Hospital — is at Http://www.dana-farber.org/Profile. Transcription: Speaker 1: Just dropping off some specimens. Speaker 2: Thank you. Reporter: It’s here in the pathology lab where tumor samples are brought in for testing. The samples are from cancer patients who have consented to be part of the Profile Project, a large research study to help speed the development of personalized cancer care with precision treatments. Dr. William Hahn is the deputy chief scientific officer at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. He helps lead the joint project with Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Boston Children’s Hospital. Dr. Hahn: We’re really excited about it, because it really represents our first foray into using molecular techniques to understand cancers, rather than anatomical criteria, and that means that all of the knowledge we’ve learned over the last 30 or 40 years about what makes cancers tick, we can now try to get at the basis of that within the DNA of a tumor. Reporter: To get the DNA, technologists isolate a sample from the tumor, and then it’s put on a slide to be checked by pathologists for quality. Dr. Neil Lindeman is the direct of the Center for Advanced Molecular Diagnostics at Brigham and Women’s Hospital where the tumor samples are then processed. Dr. Lindeman: What we’re trying to do is we’re trying to understand the genetic causes of cancers—what genes specifically are causing what cancer and how it behaves in each patient, one at at a time. And we’re using a very sophisticated and high-throughput technology that enables us to test for a lot of different changes—hundreds at once—in a lot of different patients. Reporter: That sophisticated technology allows scientists to scan tumor DNA for cancer-related abnormalities in more than 300 genes. Dr. Lindeman: This is the instrument that we use to fragment DNA… Reporter: One of the first steps in the process is breaking up the DNA into small fragments using a sonicator. Dr. Lindeman: To the principle of sonication is sound waves—ultrasound—setting up vibrations that sheer the DNA, and by tuning the sonicator to the right frequency, you can generate fragments that are roughly equal size. Reporter: Those DNA fragments are then placed into a sequencer, which uses light signals and a computer to read each letter of the DNA code and look for cancer-related changes. Dr. Hahn: What modern sequencers do is instead of doing this in a one-base-at-a-time linear manner, they sequence thousands or hundreds of thousands of pieces of DNA in a parallel manner, and then we reassemble all of that data to come up with the overall sequence. So, one way to think about this is instead of doing things one after another after another, we’re doing a million processes all at once and then taking that data and combining it at the end. Reporter: With the sequencing complete, the data are interpreted by a team of cancer investigators. The goal is to identify the specific cause of the patient’s cancer and then determine which treatment will be the most effective. Now that the project has logged more than 5,000 tumor profiles, researchers are starting to look for leads to new cancer discoveries. Dr. Lindeman: Well, I’d like to see this being done for everybody routinely continuing, and I’d like to see this transition from being a research project to a clinical project. I think results should be available in the medical record, and physicians taking care of patients should be able to see these results and act on them. Dr. Hahn: So, in the past, when we’ve looked at cancers using the best tools that we had, it was largely looking at a black box. We could discern the edges and feel a little bit about what it was that cancer might be, but we had know way of comprehensively interrogating exactly what makes up cancer. This is the first step to being able to take away that black box and really understand what it is that makes a cancer tick.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 11407

Likes : 90

DisLikes : 7

Published Date : 2018-02-02T21:15:45.000Z

Kenneth Anderson, MD, envisions the future of multiple myeloma treatment with novel therapies, including proteasome inhibitors and immunomodulatory drugs, as well as therapies for smoldering disease. Learn more about the Multiple Myeloma Program at Dana-Farber. https://www.dana-farber.org/multiple-myeloma-program/ View more presentations from the 2017 Multiple Myeloma patient Education Symposium at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. http://www.dana-farber.org/health-library/videos/multiple-myeloma-patient-symposium-video-presentations/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 7014

Likes : 17

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2018-02-28T16:58:25.000Z

What are the signs and symptoms of thyroid cancer? Dana-Farber's Jochen Lorch, MD talks about common symptoms to look out for, how to do a self exam, and when to see your physician. Learn more about the Thyroid Cancer Center at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: http://www.dana-farber.org/thyroid-cancer/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1078

Likes : 12

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-06-06T21:39:41.000Z

Emily E. Biever, MS, RD, LDN, senior clinical dietician at Dana-Farber, lays out an integrative approach to nutrition to reduce the risk of cancer, and gives dietary recommendations specific to individuals with Lynch syndrome.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2629

Likes : 10

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2016-10-20T19:37:59.000Z

Is it possible to have a full and active life after inflammatory breast cancer? This video says yes. Watch a Dana-Farber breast oncologist explain advances in treatment for this type of cancer, and a patient share her active life as a wife, mother, professional, and athlete. Learn more about research and treatment for inflammatory breast cancer and how Dana-Farber patients are supported: www.dana-farber.org/ibc
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 3351

Likes : 13

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2010-05-03T21:29:02.000Z

Getting back to full strength can take some time after cancer treatment ends. Learn strategies to hep cancer survivors deal with fatigue from Dr. William Pirl of Massachusetts General Hospital. More: http://www.dana-farber.org/pat/surviving/adult-onset/living-well/4-fatigue/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 447

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2019-02-01T21:38:04.000Z

PROACTIVE is a cutting-edge research study looking at inherited genes with known increased cancer risk. For more information, visit: https://www.dana-farber.org/cancer-genetics-and-prevention/research/proactive-research-study/
    

Channel Title : CSHL Leading Strand

Views : 730

Likes : 7

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Published Date : 2017-03-20T14:35:59.000Z

"Edgetics" from the Systems Biology;Networks meeting at CSHL, March 18,2017 http://ccsb.dfci.harvard.edu Attend a CSHL meeting: http://bit.ly/cshlmtg Train at a CSHL course: http://bit.ly/cshlcourses Subscribe to receive new video notifications: http://bit.ly/2aVrXaM CONNECT WITH US Blog: http://bit.ly/cshlcxblog Twitter: http://bit.ly/cshlmctwitter Instagram: http://bit.ly/cshlmcinsta Facebook: http://bit.ly/cshlmcfb Website: http://bit.ly/cshlmtgcrs
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 7773

Likes : 45

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2014-12-29T17:32:28.000Z

Kenneth C. Anderson, MD, director of the Jerome Lipper Multiple Myeloma Cancer and LeBow Institute for Myeloma Therapeutics at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, explores the emerging treatment options for patients with multiple myeloma. This presentation was originally given at the Multiple Myeloma Patient Education Symposium on Dec. 13, 2014 in Boston, MA. Learn more about Dana-Farber's research and treatment for multiple myeloma at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Hematologic-Oncology-Treatment-Center/Multiple-Myeloma-Program.aspx.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 262

Likes : 1

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-12-12T20:15:10.000Z

Ursula A. Matulonis, MD, describes her approach to caring for women with gynecologic cancer. To learn more about the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, visit: http://www.dana-farber.org/susan-f-smith-center-for-womens-cancers/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1102

Likes : 7

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2017-06-06T21:21:17.000Z

Dana-Farber genetic counselors, Sam Stickevers, LGC, and Sarah Cochrane, LGC, give an overview of the genetics of Lynch syndrome, genetic testing and questions surrounding test results for Lynch syndrome.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 6145

Likes : 28

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2010-05-03T21:31:47.000Z

Feeling sad, lonely, or irritable after cancer treatment is common, but these feelings can become a problem if they interfere with daily life, says Karen Fasciano, a psychologist at Dana-Farber. More: http://www.dana-farber.org/pat/surviving/adult-onset/living-well/5-depression/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1430

Likes : 13

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2014-11-24T17:01:04.000Z

Nikhil Wagle, MD, a medical oncologist in the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers at Dana-Farber, discusses the latest research in breast cancer genomics. This presentation was originally given at the Metastatic Breast Cancer Forum held on Oct. 18, 2014 at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 99

Likes : 1

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2019-04-26T19:09:03.000Z

Dr. Lakshmi Nayak, director of Central Nervous System (CNS) Lymphoma Center, explains the diagnosis and treatment of CNS Lymphoma. The CNS Lymphoma Center is dedicated to providing comprehensive care and research for patients with primary or secondary CNS Lymphoma. With the most advanced treatment options available, and a multidisciplinary approach to care, the CNS Lymphoma Center is uniquely qualified to advance the outcome of patients with these tumors. Learn more about the CNS Lymphoma Center: https://www.dana-farber.org/cns-lymphoma-center/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 8358

Likes : 31

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2013-08-08T17:03:29.000Z

In this video, Dr. Eric Winer, Director of the Breast Oncology Program and one of the leaders of the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers at Dana-Farber, shares the definition of DCIS, weighs in on whether or not DCIS is considered cancer, and describes treatment options for women with DCIS. Learn more about how Dana-Farber's physicians treat breast cancer at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Breast-Cancer-Treatment-Center.aspx. at http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Breast-Cancer-Treatment-Center.aspx. Transcription: Dr. Winer: DCIS stands for ‘Ductal Carcinoma In Situ.’ Before the widespread use of screening mammography, DCIS was a very, very infrequent diagnosis. In most cases, it is found on a mammogram, oftentimes because there are calcifications that are seen, and I think it’s important that women understand that not all calcifications are DCIS—in fact, most calcifications are not—but there are certain calcifications on the mammogram that can make it much more likely that DCIS will be there. These are true cancer cells, but they are sitting entirely within the ducts, and they do not have the ability to spread to other parts of the body, because they are walled in within the ducts system. Text: Is DCIS cancer? Dr. Winer: So, there’s been discussion recently about whether DCIS—Ductal Carcinoma In Situ—should be called ‘cancer’ at all. In my mind, it’s not what we call it; it’s what it is and having that conversation with a patient that’s most critical. Those who argue that we shouldn’t call it ‘cancer’ say that the name ‘cancer’ in and of itself creates such fear that it paralyzes women, and they're not able to make the best possible decisions. Those that say that it should be called ‘cancer’ recognize the fact that these are true cancer cells, and there’s the potential that this can develop into an invasive cancer. From my standpoint, what’s important is that a woman with DCIS understands that her chance of dying from DCIS is almost zero, and that the reason that DCIS is important is that if the DCIS is untreated, it has the potential to lead to a diagnosis of invasive breast cancer. And so, what this is all about is conversations between doctors and patients and not letting the terminology use frighten, but instead to be guided by what the real facts are. Text: How is DCIS treated? Dr. Winer: We treat DCIS largely prevent the development of invasive breast cancer, and treatment typically includes surgery and sometimes radiation and sometimes hormonal therapy. The surgery that’s done is typically either a lumpectomy or occasionally a mastectomy. There are women with DCIS who need to undergo a mastectomy if, in fact, the DCIS is very extensive and the surgeon is unable to remove it entirely with a lumpectomy. For women who can have a lumpectomy—and that means that the entire area of DCIS is removed—in general, radiation is given after a lumpectomy; although, there are some studies that have tried to eliminate radiation, and there’s a great deal of debate about who should and who shouldn’t receive radiation after a diagnosis of Ductal Carcinoma In Situ. Occasionally—or perhaps more than occasionally—the drug is used as well to prevent a recurrence of DCIS in the breast, but many women decide that the side effects associated with any kind of drug are really too troublesome to make it worthwhile to take it in this setting, because it’s important to remember that DCIS in and of itself is not life threatening. The reason we treat it, once again, is to prevent the diagnosis of invasive breast cancer, so women who have a diagnosis of DCIS should recognize that their chance of going and doing well after treatment from DCIS is extraordinarily high.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 3488

Likes : 18

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2012-06-12T13:07:43.000Z

Dr. Corey Cutler, who started the Bone Marrow Transplant Survivorship program, describes the different types of transplants that are available today, such as reduced intensity transplantation and umbilical cord blood transplantation. Dr. Cutler also addresses some of the pulmonary and cardiovascular complications that may occur as a result of a transplant. Find out more about survivorship at: http://www.dana-farber.org/For-Adult-Cancer-Survivors.aspx
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 458

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-06-05T17:33:38.000Z

Samuel Ng, MD, PhD, treats patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma, Hodgkin lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). Taking a very transparent approach tp to patient care, Dr. Ng involves patients and their families in each decision in the treatment journey. Learn more about the Adult Lymphoma program at: http://www.dana-farber.org/lymphoma-program/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 185

Likes : 6

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2019-03-21T19:41:46.000Z

The Lynch Syndrome Center at Dana-Farber provides comprehensive care for patients and families who have a diagnosis or family history of Lynch syndrome. Learn more at https://www.dana-farber.org/lynchsyndrome
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1006

Likes : 4

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2017-01-19T21:45:26.000Z

Dr. Catherine Wu comments on her latest research involving chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) including the impact of mutated SF3B1 on CLL-associated pathways.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2150

Likes : 16

DisLikes : 1

Published Date : 2014-11-06T17:07:15.000Z

Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Nutritionist Emily Biever, MS, RN, LDN, discusses healthy eating tips for brain tumor patients. Learn about diets, food fads, and healthy recipes. This presentation was originally given at the "Living with Brain Tumors" event held at Dana-Farber on Sept. 20, 2014.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 10648

Likes : 56

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2013-11-11T17:50:23.000Z

HER2-positive breast cancer represents 15-20 percent of all new cases of breast cancer. Eric P. Winer, MD, director of Breast Oncology at the Susan F. Smith Center for Women's Cancers, describes HER2-positive breast cancer symptoms and treatment options. To find out more visit http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Treatment-Centers-and-Clinical-Services/Breast-Cancer-Treatment-Center.aspx Transcription: HER2-positive breast cancer represents about 15% to 20% of all new cases of breast cancer. In women who have HER2-positive breast cancer—and the occasional man, of course, who may have this—there are too many copies of the HER2 gene in the nucleus of the cancer cell, and that gives rise to too much HER2 protein on the surface of the cancer cell. As a result of HER2, the cancer cell is able to grow and spread and invade more readily. HER2 is something that is very important for the cancer, because it helps it survive and flourish, which is of course good for the cancer and bad for the patient. This used to be one of the worst subtypes of breast cancer—and it probably does tend to affect younger women a little bit more than older women, although we see it for across all ages—but what has changed is that over the past 15 years, we have developed so-called ‘targeted treatments’ for HER2-positive breast cancer. The first of those treatments is the drug Trastuzumab, which a lot of people call ‘Herceptin,’ but there are three additional targeted treatments that are now approved for HER2-positive breast cancer, which include the drug called Pertuzumab and a drug called T-DM1 and a drug called Lapatinib—all of these are very drugs for HER2-positive breast cancer. Sometimes they’re used alone. Most of the time they’re used in combination with other treatments—specifically chemotherapy or other forms of anti-HER2 treatment—and they can be very, very effective. What has changed is that as a result of these treatments, there are more women with early-stage HER2-positive breast cancer who are cured of their cancer, and even in women who have more advanced forms of cancer, who have stage 4 or metastatic HER2-positive breast cancer. These drugs have prolonged life and as importantly have dramatically affected quality of life.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 4594

Likes : 11

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2008-12-12T21:06:44.000Z

Chandrajit P. Raut, MD, MSc, Associate Surgeon, Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center in Boston, talks about his work and discusses the benefits of focusing solely on sarcoma care and research. Learn more about sarcoma treatment at Dana-Farber Cancer Institute: http://www.dana-farber.org/pat/adult/sarcoma/default.html
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 2400

Likes : 10

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2014-01-06T22:30:39.000Z

Good nutrition is part of a healthy lifestyle, along with exercise, weight management, not smoking, and reducing stress. Good nutrition also plays a critical role during cancer treatment and needs to be an important part of your overall treatment plan. For more information, recipes, tips and to view additional videos, visit http://www.dana-farber.org/eatingwell. Transcription: I’m Stacy Kennedy, nutrition specialist for Dana-Farber Cancer Institute. Welcome to Eating Well During Cancer. Today, I’d like to talk to you about the link between nutrition and cancer. Good nutrition can play a role and have an impact throughout the journey of cancer. Research has shown that eating a healthy diet along with regular exercise, weight management, not smoking cigarettes, and reducing stress can all help to lower your risk of developing certain types of cancers, promote feeling well during treatment, managing symptoms like fatigue or bowel changes, loss of appetite, and also help promote survivorship. We know that eating well can be a challenge during cancer treatment, but it’s so important and can have a very strong impact on everything from helping to increase your energy level to boosting your immune system. It’s important to work with a nutritionist who specializes in cancer treatment along your journey through cancer. At Dana-Farber we have a team of specialists ready to work with you and help customize the best diet for you during treatment, as well as beyond into survivorship. If you’re not a patient at Dana-Farber, or even if you are would like more information, tips, and recipes, we encourage you to visit our website or to download our free app. On behalf of the nutrition department at Dana-Farber, I’m Stacy Kennedy.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 1019

Likes : 7

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-06-05T17:24:32.000Z

Marlise Luskin, MD, MSCE, is a physician in Dana-Farber’s Adult Leukemia program. She treats patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), acute myeloid leukemia (AML), myelodysplastic syndrome and a number of other blood cancers. Luskin discusses her approach to a patient’s first visit, and helping patients understand their disease and treatment options. Learn more about the leukemia program: http://www.dana-farber.org/adult-leukemia-program/
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 3721

Likes : 19

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2015-04-17T15:02:26.000Z

Should vitamins and supplements be a part of a cancer patient's diet? Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center Nutritionist Stacy Kennedy, MPH, RD, CSO, discusses the best foods and diet for cancer patients. This video was originally filmed as part of a live video webchat, "The Best Foods and Diet for Cancer Treatment and Survivorship," held on March 25, 2015. View the entire webchat here: https://youtu.be/w-92_tZr_B0 More information on nutrition during cancer treatment is available at: http://www.dana-farber.org/nutrition Transcription: You really want to go back to your dietician and to your doctor with any of these questions, because certain supplements are important and helpful. Some people need to take Vitamin D. Some people need to take probiotics. Magnesium sometimes, if your blood level is low from chemo. But there are other supplements that can actually reduce the effectiveness of your treatment. For example, taking high-dose antioxidant pills during radiation therapy may reduce its effectiveness—same thing for chemo. So, you don’t want to be going through all of this and doing something that’s inadvertently sort of compromising its success to some extent. One thing that people often are understandably confused about is, ‘Well, then I guess I shouldn’t eat blueberries, because those have antioxidants.’ And the issue and concern is just with supplements, which can be high dose, potent, and also to some extent a lack of regulation, so we don’t want you skipping those fruits and veggies. We want you picking those and asking your doctor about the supplements. Don’t just start taking vitamins thinking they’re going to fill in the gaps.
    

Channel Title : Dana-Farber Cancer Institute

Views : 3447

Likes : 26

DisLikes : 2

Published Date : 2014-01-29T21:09:50.000Z

For more information about testicular cancer symptoms, diagnosis, treatment, and support, visit http://www.dana-farber.org/Adult-Care/Treatment-and-Support/Testicular-Cancer.aspx. Dr. Clair Beard, Director of the Testicular Cancer Program at Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women's Cancer Center, describes treatment options for men diagnosed with testicular cancer. Transcription: Stage 1 testicular cancer implies that there is only cancer in the testicle, and now the testicle has been removed. You've had your blood tests, your tumor markers, and there’s no sign of any tumor marker elevation after the testicle has been removed. You’ve had a chest X-ray, a chest CT; there’s no sign of tumor in the test. And you've had an abdomen and pelvis CT scan, and there’s no sign of tumor in the abdomen. So, you have a stage 1 tumor. So now, you have choices. One choice is to have monitoring—we call this ‘active surveillance’—and that means no more treatment, just monitoring. With active surveillance, we don’t treat anybody unless they relapse, and the chance of relapse is dependent upon what kind of cancer was actually in the testicle. If you had a seminoma, your chance of relapse is between 10% and 15%. With certain kinds of non-seminoma, the chance of relapse can be as low as 10% and as high as 50%, so the monitoring schedule that we set up for you is dependent upon the kind of testicular cancer you have. You might have a CAT scan as infrequently as every six months or as frequently as every three months—it depends on, again, the histology. Then what happens is you come in for your CAT scan, however often as necessary. You come in and the CAT scan is negative; you go home and wait until your next CAT scan appointment. And then if your CAT scans are free and clear, you never have to have treatment. If at any time something shows up on the CAT scan, then—and only then—do you receive treatment. Then the treatment depends on what shows up. If you have a seminoma and a small lymph node shows up at some point on your CAT scan, well then you can have a course of low-dose radiotherapy. If you have a non-seminoma and a lymph node shows up, you might have some chemotherapy. Now, for some patients—particularly with non-seminoma—you might think, ‘Well, I don’t know if I want to come in every three months for a CAT scan, or every four months for a CAT scan. I might want treatment now—this makes me nervous.’ Well, you might choose to have one cycle of three kinds of chemotherapy, and this is very effective treatment. That decreases your risk of recurrence from 50% down to less than 5%. So, for some patients that’s an option, and our medical oncologist would discuss that with you. The important thing to understand when you have stage 1 testicular cancer is whether you choose for upfront treatment or you choose to be monitored, the cure is exactly the same—it’s almost 100% either way, so patients do really well with stage 1 testicular cancer. Stage 2 testicular cancer implies that you have some tumor in the upper abdomen. When testicular cancer spreads, it spreads first to the upper abdomen—not to the lymph nodes near the testicular—but actually the lymphs nodes near the kidneys. For those patients, treatment can be low-dose radiotherapy for seminoma patients, and pretty much everybody else it’s chemotherapy. Typically what happens is patients get three or four cycles of chemotherapy, and a cycle is a grouping of chemotherapy typically given over three weeks. They get their CAT scans after the chemotherapy is completed. They go into complete remission, and then they're monitored in the months and years that follow chemotherapy. Again, cure rates are very, very high. Patients do very well. It’s important if you choose to have treatment for your stage 2 testicular cancer to receive treatment with someone who understands how to treat testicular cancer. Testicular cancer is rare. It’s a little bit tricky to treat, so it’s important to have someone who knows how to treat testicular cancer properly. For stages 3 and 4 testicular cancer, the treatments are more elaborate. Typically you're receiving more than just three cycles of chemotherapy. Sometimes surgery is necessary. Sometimes salvage chemotherapy is necessary—these are different kinds of chemotherapy. Sometimes high-dose chemotherapy is necessary. These are all specialty treatments that need to be given at a high-volume specialty center, like Dana-Farber.

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