Hip Hop Universe....!

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Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 41736

Likes : 1645

DisLikes : 77

Published Date : 2018-04-13T19:44:07.000Z

Best Rap Songs Of All Time / Best Rap Song Of Each Year / Best Hip-Hop Songs Each Year The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. Best Hip-Hop Songs Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BF5aKI6FHgM I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the 100 greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 176300

Likes : 3325

DisLikes : 3423

Published Date : 2017-12-30T16:00:05.000Z

Worst Hip-Hop Songs 2017 / Worst Rap Songs 2017 / Best Hip-Hop songs 2017 Picking the worst songs of the year is serious business. It’s like I always say: Saying something is the best is a matter of opinion, but declaring something the worst requires evidence. You can’t just go with the songs that you’re sick of hearing or find mildly irritating. You must dig through all the garbage released in a given year and determine what is demonstrably terrible. These songs must clear rooms, ruin days, and cause physical discomfort. And it takes hard work, patience, fortitude, and partial deafness to help withstand the steady onslaught of bad you must endure to find those songs. But I’ve done it! These are the worst songs of 2017, ranked in order from infuriatingly insipid to awful ear-poisoning. 2017 also introduced us to Lil Pump, who recently broke the record for shortest song on the Billboard Top 10 with his single "Gucci Gang." The song went on to peak at No. 3, which is fairly impressive considering its short duration. Shortly before Pump came Ski Mask The Slump God, 2017 XXL Freshman XXXTentacion and Trippie Redd, all of who have become viral hip-hop sensations over the past year for their crafty, unhinged lyrics and visually appealing, somewhat eerie videos. Millions drew to them, and still do; others are not as impressed. For those not riding the new wave, rap front runners JAY-Z and Kendrick Lamar came through in the clutch with their deliveries of 4:44 and DAMN., respectively. The albums provided lyrical heat and production hip-hop fans, old and new, can appreciate for decades on end. Their new albums were given over a handful of nominations for the 2018 Grammy Awards, with JAY-Z's project up for Album of the Year. Then, of course, 2017 is the year Cardi B rose from Love & Hip Hop fame to No. 1 on the Billboard charts for her catchy summer banger "Bodak Yellow." Everyone from Janet Jackson to middle school teachers have pledged their allegiance to Bardi Gang, proving the Bronx rapper is a force to be reckoned with. Hip-hop has been vastly acknowledged this year from all corners of the entertainment industry. Between that and the number of hits released from acts like Migos, DJ Khaled and A$AP Ferg, rap has become the most consumed genre in the U.S. We've Milly Rocked in New York with Playboi Carti, created our own renditions of Future's "Mask Off" instrumental and counted millions with 21 Savage all year long. Behold: Top 100 - The Worst Hip-Hop Songs Of 2017 Artists mentioned in this video: Nicki Minaj, Lil Wayne, Drake, Quality Control, Quavo, Migos, Lil Yachty, Lil U. Vert, Lanze, Dj Khaled, Chance The Rapper, French Montana, Playboi Carti, Ayo & Teo, Post Malone, 21 Savage, Kodak Black, IceJJFish, Raw Dizzy, Yo Gotti, Cardi B, Fetty Wap, Famous Dex, Kap G, 2Chainz, TY Dolla $ign, Trey Songz, Young Thug, Future, Chris Brown, Y2DA, Lil Durk, Troy Ave, Macklemore, Trinidad James, Young M.A, Rileydatboss, Jose Guapo, Youngboy, Baka Not Ice, Gucci Mane, Lonzo Ball, Marshmello, Lil Skies, Landon Cube, Lil Xan, PNB Rock, A Boogie With Da Hoodie, Rich The Kid, Swae Lee, Nipsey Hustle, Plies, Logan Paul, Ricegum, G-Eazy, A$AP Rocky, Juicy J, Belly, Smokepurpp, Souljah Boy, YBN Nahmir, Lil Jon, Future, Trippie Redd, Gudda Gudda, Hoodybaby, MadeInTYO, SCARLXRD, $.Boy$, Jake Paul, Forever Anti Pop, Chris King, Kyle, 6ix9ine, Rae Sremmurd, Bebe Rexha, Iggy Azalea, Lil Debbie, V-Nasty, Kyyngg, Lil Pump Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 92716

Likes : 2165

DisLikes : 433

Published Date : 2017-12-23T17:11:12.000Z

Best Hip-Hop Songs 2017 / Best Rap Songs / Best Rap Song Of Each Year What a year 2017 has been. The Lil's have taken over with a vengeance, and their music has taken them to new heights. Meanwhile, seasoned rap artists have provided classics to bump well into the New Year. Over the last 12 months, hip-hop has witnessed how the genre has transformed from what it once was five years ago. 2017 also introduced us to Lil Pump, who recently broke the record for shortest song on the Billboard Top 10 with his single "Gucci Gang." The song went on to peak at No. 3, which is fairly impressive considering its short duration. Shortly before Pump came Ski Mask The Slump God, 2017 XXL Freshman XXXTentacion and Trippie Redd, all of who have become viral hip-hop sensations over the past year for their crafty, unhinged lyrics and visually appealing, somewhat eerie videos. Millions drew to them, and still do; others are not as impressed. For those not riding the new wave, rap front runners JAY-Z and Kendrick Lamar came through in the clutch with their deliveries of 4:44 and DAMN., respectively. The albums provided lyrical heat and production hip-hop fans, old and new, can appreciate for decades on end. Their new albums were given over a handful of nominations for the 2018 Grammy Awards, with JAY-Z's project up for Album of the Year. Then, of course, 2017 is the year Cardi B rose from Love & Hip Hop fame to No. 1 on the Billboard charts for her catchy summer banger "Bodak Yellow." Everyone from Janet Jackson to middle school teachers have pledged their allegiance to Bardi Gang, proving the Bronx rapper is a force to be reckoned with. Hip-hop has been vastly acknowledged this year from all corners of the entertainment industry. Between that and the number of hits released from acts like Migos, DJ Khaled and A$AP Ferg, rap has become the most consumed genre in the U.S. We've Milly Rocked in New York with Playboi Carti, created our own renditions of Future's "Mask Off" instrumental and counted millions with 21 Savage all year long. Get ready for the ultimate Hip-Hop playlist, filled with massive songs from the likes of EMINEM, JAY-Z, Kendrick Lamar, The Wu-Tang Clan etc. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 3296268

Likes : 77129

DisLikes : 3594

Published Date : 2017-07-15T16:00:03.000Z

Best Rap Song Of Each Year / Best Rap Songs Of All Time / Best Hip-Hop Songs 70s Hip-Hop/80s Hip-Hop/90's Hip Hop/Hip-Hop 2000s/ Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 321502

Likes : 5828

DisLikes : 436

Published Date : 2018-04-03T18:01:16.000Z

Songs That Made Rappers Famous / How Rappers Got Famous / Most Popular Rap Songs (One Hit Wonders) Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. These phases can be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 69283

Likes : 2046

DisLikes : 240

Published Date : 2017-10-27T16:00:03.000Z

Best Hip-Hop Albums / Best Rap Songs Of All Time / Evolution Of Hip-Hop Hip-hop has produced plenty of great music over its 40-plus history. Some of them are worthy of the title "greatest rap album," some more than others. That's the essence of this list. These albums were picked on the grounds creativity, originality, replay value, lyricism and overall cultural impact. What are the best hip hop albums of all time? The answer, of course, is totally subjective. Everyone has differing opinions about which hip hop and rap albums should be ranked on top, and that's what this list is all about. Vote for your personal favorite hip hop albums ever, and vote down those albums listed that you don't feel are worthy of the honor. The hip-hop albums here represent decades of great music from notables rappers and hip-hop artists -- some we've lost, and others who continue to make great music year after year. Some of the biggest and best hip hop albums ever made include classics like The Chronic from Dr. Dre, Fear of a Black Planet by Public Enemy, Paid in Full by Eric B. and Rakim and N***az4Life by N.W.A. And no list of amazing hip hop albums would be complete without Enter the Wu-Tang: 36 Chambers by Wu-Tang Clan and Life After Death by The Notorious B.I.G. If your favorite hip hop album isn't listed here, by all means, add it. And don't forget to include whatever great 2017 hip hop albums you loved. They might be new, but some are instant classics. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 49244

Likes : 2204

DisLikes : 324

Published Date : 2018-03-27T18:18:53.000Z

Best New School Rappers / Best Rappers Of The New School / Top 50 New School Rappers Hip hop heads, who are the best new school rappers? Mainstream rap keeps changing over the years with gangsta rap becoming more underground, while trap music quickly rose in popularity. Regardless of rap's evolution, the best current rappers still have powerful lyrics, catchy hooks, and good beats. Which rapper is currently at the top of the hip hop game? People often complain about the lack of lyricists in Hip Hop’s new generation. While the lyrically proficient MCs might not be getting the major looks like their melodic counterparts, they’re still out there and dropping excellent music worthy of recognition. With back-to-school season in full effect, Hip-Hop Universe has donned the teacher’s cap and put together a lesson plan on some of the new school’s finest rappers. While this isn’t the definitive lineup of the best rappers of this generation, it should give readers an idea of who’s out there. Plenty of rappers deserve some shine, so think of this as the opening chapter of the Hip Hop fan’s textbook on the new class. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 745921

Likes : 13246

DisLikes : 441

Published Date : 2018-03-24T15:00:01.000Z

Evolution Of Diss Songs / Best Diss Song Every Year / Best Diss Songs Of All Time Nothing says rap better than a good feud! What's beef? Is it when your mom ain't safe up in the street? Or is it actually the fifth element of hip-hop? Dating all of the way back to when Big Bank Hank of the Sugar Hill Gang borrowed Grandmaster Caz's rhyme book and used his lyrics without credit on "Rapper's Delight," MCs have been feuding on and off wax for years. Hip-hop is a culture built around machismo and bravado, so backing down or losing a battle could be detrimental to an artist's career. One slip-up and you could find yourself with a one-way ticket to obscurity. Certain MCs have built entire careers around beefing with other artists, while others have had their careers d*stroyed with just a couple lines. But what once began as two rappers simply battling over skill has turned into big business, with parody music videos, elaborate stage shows and entire albums dedicated to the coveted battle. The ante is constantly being upped to keep the fans entertained, so lines will be crossed while artists strive to find unique and creative ways to slander their opponents. Mothers, women and children have all been involved, and in the YouTube era, a rapper just might show up to your house with a camera crew looking for a br*wl. The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 49556

Likes : 1692

DisLikes : 218

Published Date : 2018-03-18T18:40:53.000Z

Wort Rappers Of All Time / Rappers That Are Not Wack / Rappers That I Remove From My Worst Rappers List These are 20 Rappers that I remove from my "Worst Rappers Of All Time" list. For every decent, innovative rapper out there, there are several copycat artists that bring nothing to the table. We’ve listed what we feel are the worst of the worst in the genre. We know that best of and worst of lists are subjective. What we feel is the bottom of the barrel, you might think is pretty great. Sales have nothing to do with it either. While researching this list we’ve discovered there are some million-selling artists like Iggy Azalea, Drake and Nikki Minaj that are pretty polarizing among hip hop aficionados. This is an update for the "Worst Rappers Of All Time" Series: Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVKnbtnd0As Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDXbHeIGPfQ Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ab3HXMvUK4E Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 304053

Likes : 6553

DisLikes : 313

Published Date : 2017-08-19T16:00:05.000Z

Best Hip-Hop Song Of Each Year / Best Rap Songs Of All Time / Evolution Of Rap 70s Hip-Hop/80s Hip-Hop/90's Hip Hop/Hip-Hop 2000s Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? This Timeline shows how Hip-Hop has changed from 1979 up to 2017. Which Hip-Hop era do you prefer? Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 2077366

Likes : 25284

DisLikes : 1830

Published Date : 2017-07-08T16:00:02.000Z

Best Rap Songs Of All Time / Best Rap Song Of Each Year / Evolution Of Hip-Hop The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. Best Hip-Hop Songs Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTlaQsdgT_8 I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the 100 greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 21135

Likes : 1034

DisLikes : 116

Published Date : 2018-04-08T15:21:59.000Z

Best Rap Albums By Letter / Best Hip-Hop Albums From A to Z / Best Hip-Hop Songs Of All Time Top 100 Hip-Hop Albums Of All Time: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mke7QR2ag7c Best Rap Songs By Letter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_nF7vwUwpU4 Best Rapper By Letter: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FUGaBRXLQRE The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 260421

Likes : 5871

DisLikes : 296

Published Date : 2018-03-16T20:23:50.000Z

Best Songs Of Each Year / Old School Rap Vs. New School / Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 275134

Likes : 5472

DisLikes : 1807

Published Date : 2017-06-29T14:01:07.000Z

Best Rappers Of All Time / Greatest Rapper Of All Time / Best MC Everyone has an opinion who is the G.O.A.T (Greatest Of All Time) and everyone has a list of their favorite MC's. Who's the greatest MC of all time? What does that title really mean? What does it take to become the greatest rapper ever? Times change. Skills fade. New greats emerge; old ones decline. How do you crown one MC the best when there are so many great emcees still working? The following 100 emcees have done everything it takes to make a play for the throne. Finally, a definitive list of the best rappers of all time, ranked by fans all over the world. From the early '80s to present day, this list counts down rap's best lyricists and game changers in history. Lil' Wayne, Method Man, Jay-Z, Eminem, Andre 3000, and T.I are among the artists that appear on this amazing countdown. Rappers from all cities, both genders, and all races are all vying to be crowned the greatest rapper ever. What makes a rapper great? There are a number of differing definitions and philosophies. Rapper J. Cole (who finds himself on the Ultimate List below) cites consistency as the most important attribute, and says it's important to look both for the big humorous "punch" lines as well as the underlying message of the rapper's songs. Nas (another MC featured on the list) focuses as well on the meaning of the songs, as well as the scale and ambition of the rapper's narratives and storytelling. (He has also gone on the record as saying that there is no such thing as the "best rapper" or "Greatest of All Time" - often abbreviated as G.O.A.T.) Numerous different skills and attributes all must come together to make a truly legendary MC. Obviously, a rapper must display a sense of rhythm and an ability to compliment the beat in unpredictable and exciting ways. A gift for lyricism and vocabulary is similarly essential - you can have the flow of the century, but if the words don't come together to tell a compelling story or present a unique point of view, it's still not going to translate into a great hip-hop song. But of course there's also an intangible element that elevates some rappers into the ranks of the greatest of all time. Who are these rappers who stand heads above the competition? You tell us, by voting for your favorites below or making your own list of Top Rappers. So these rappers come into mind when the question "who is the best rapper of all time" comes into mind. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 39621

Likes : 1539

DisLikes : 25

Published Date : 2018-03-31T17:14:48.000Z

Best Hip-Hop Beefs & Feuds / Evolution Of Diss Tracks / Best Diss Tracks Nothing says rap better than a good feud! What's beef? Is it when your mom ain't safe up in the street? Or is it actually the fifth element of hip-hop? Dating all of the way back to when Big Bank Hank of the Sugar Hill Gang borrowed Grandmaster Caz's rhyme book and used his lyrics without credit on "Rapper's Delight," MCs have been feuding on and off wax for years. Hip-hop is a culture built around machismo and bravado, so backing down or losing a battle could be detrimental to an artist's career. One slip-up and you could find yourself with a one-way ticket to obscurity. Certain MCs have built entire careers around beefing with other artists, while others have had their careers d*stroyed with just a couple lines. But what once began as two rappers simply battling over skill has turned into big business, with parody music videos, elaborate stage shows and entire albums dedicated to the coveted battle. The ante is constantly being upped to keep the fans entertained, so lines will be crossed while artists strive to find unique and creative ways to slander their opponents. Mothers, women and children have all been involved, and in the YouTube era, a rapper just might show up to your house with a camera crew looking for a br*wl. The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 170117

Likes : 4161

DisLikes : 166

Published Date : 2018-04-21T10:59:37.000Z

J. Cole Diss Lil Pump 1985 / J Cole KOD Album / Lil Pump Reacts To J. Cole / J. Cole finally responds to Lil Pump / J. Cole Disses Lil Pump KOD (Mumble Rappers) / J. Cole - ATM J. Cole released his highly anticipated fifth studio album KOD on Friday (April 20), and fans online are already singling out the LP’s closing track — “1985 (Intro to ‘The Fall Off’)” — for its subliminals While the song serves as a lecture of sorts for today’s new generation of so-called “mumble rappers,” many fans and commentators believe Cole is calling out one artist in particular: Lil Pump, though he doesn’t mention anyone explicitly. “I heard one of em diss me, I’m surprised/ I ain’t trippin, listen good to my reply/ Come here lil man, let me talk with ya/ See if I can paint for you the larger picture,” Cole raps, before breaking down his intended target. Back in April of 2017, Lil Pump teased a song titled “F*ck J. Cole” via social media. The cut — produced by fellow Florida rapper Smokepurpp — features a whole bunch of “b*tch-ass” and “ugly-*ss” insults toward the Dreamville Records bossman, though Purpp later explained they were just trolling. Here's the full KOD track list: 1. J. Cole - Intro 2. J. Cole - K.O.D 3. J. Cole - Photograph 4. J. Cole - The Cut Off ft. Kill Edward 5. J. Cole - ATM 6. J. Cole - Motives 7. J. Cole - Kevin's Heart 8. J. Cole - BRACKETS 9. J. Cole - Once An Addict (Interlude) 10. J. Cole - FRIENDS ft. Kill Edward 11. J. Cole - Window Pain (Outro) 12. J. Cole - 1985 (Intro To The Fall Off) While Cole reportedly asked fans and attendees to try and keep details from the listening session a secret, many have been sharing what they experienced during the event at Gramercy Theatre on social media, giving us a heads up on what to expect. There's no confirmation on the project's tracklist, but based on people's tweets and posts, we may be in store for a top notch Cole album featuring experimental flows and sounds. KOD follows in the footsteps of Cole's last LP, 4 Your Eyez Only, which he dropped back in 2016. Check out everything you need to know from J. Cole's KOD album listening session below. Fans Formed a Packed Line Outside of Gramercy Theatre Jermaine Lamarr Cole (born January 28, 1985), better known by his stage name J. Cole, is an American hip hop recording artist and record producer. Raised in Fayetteville, North Carolina, Cole initially gained recognition as a rapper following the release of his debut mixtape, The Come Up, in early-2007. Intent on further pursuing a solo career as a rapper, he went on to release two additional mixtapes after signing to Jay-Z's Roc Nation imprint in 2009. Cole released his debut studio album, Cole World: The Sideline Story, in 2011. It debuted at #1 on the U.S. Billboard 200, and was soon certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). His next two releases, 2013's Born Sinner and 2014's 2014 Forest Hills Drive, received mostly positive reviews from critics, while being both certified platinum in the United States. 2014's Forest Hills Drive also went platinum with no featuring artists. The latter earned him his first Grammy Award nomination for Best Rap Album. In December 2016, Cole released his fourth studio album 4 Your Eyez Only. The album debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200 chart and was certified platinum in April 2017. Self-taught on piano, Cole also acts as a producer alongside his hip-hop career, producing singles for artists such as Kendrick Lamar and Janet Jackson, as well as handling the majority of the production in his own projects. He has also developed other ventures, including Dreamville Records, as well as a non-profit organization called the Dreamville Foundation. In January 2015, Cole decided to house single mothers rent-free at his childhood home in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Hip-Hop Beefs Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxwRDuzSTRn6i3Dy8Z1kAldR ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 1570504

Likes : 22162

DisLikes : 1892

Published Date : 2017-02-20T22:27:12.000Z

Best Diss Tracks / Best Diss Records / Best Disses / Best Diss Songs. Nothing says rap better than a good feud! What's beef? Is it when your mom ain't safe up in the street? Or is it actually the fifth element of hip-hop? Dating all of the way back to when Big Bank Hank of the Sugar Hill Gang borrowed Grandmaster Caz's rhyme book and used his lyrics without credit on "Rapper's Delight," MCs have been feuding on and off wax for years. Hip-hop is a culture built around machismo and bravado, so backing down or losing a battle could be detrimental to an artist's career. One slip-up and you could find yourself with a one-way ticket to obscurity. Certain MCs have built entire careers around beefing with other artists, while others have had their careers d*stroyed with just a couple lines. But what once began as two rappers simply battling over skill has turned into big business, with parody music videos, elaborate stage shows and entire albums dedicated to the coveted battle. The ante is constantly being upped to keep the fans entertained, so lines will be crossed while artists strive to find unique and creative ways to slander their opponents. Mothers, women and children have all been involved, and in the YouTube era, a rapper just might show up to your house with a camera crew looking for a br*wl Drake's Back To Back is the greatest battle record of all time. But let's take a look at the diss songs that were overshadowed by Drakes Meek Mill diss. Let's take a journey to the past and let's take a look at the historic beefs that occurred. What was the biggest beef of all time? Who battled who? Which Diss Songs were relevant? So with beef always in season, Hip-Hop Universe has compiled The 50 Best Hip-Hop Diss Songs for your consumption. Vegetarians beware. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 48221

Likes : 2643

DisLikes : 34

Published Date : 2018-04-06T15:52:48.000Z

If You Rap You Lose / Try Not To Rap / Best Rap Songs Of All Time Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. These phases can be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lesser known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 1003294

Likes : 18228

DisLikes : 1661

Published Date : 2017-02-23T11:04:06.000Z

Old School Rap Vs. New School / Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 338768

Likes : 5855

DisLikes : 5856

Published Date : 2017-07-01T13:17:10.000Z

Worst Rappers Of All Time / Wack Rappers / Wackest Rappers For every decent, innovative rapper out there, there are several copycat artists that bring nothing to the table. We’ve listed what we feel are the worst of the worst in the genre. We know that best of and worst of lists are subjective. What we feel is the bottom of the barrel, you might think is pretty great. Sales have nothing to do with it either. While researching this list we’ve discovered there are some million-selling artists like Iggy Azalea, Drake and Nikki Minaj that are pretty polarizing among hip hop aficionados. We need your input. Who, to you, is the worst rapper out there? Take a look at the list and let us know, and if there’s someone you think we’ve overlooked be sure and let us know! Who is the worst rapper ever? Let's find out. I know many people will dislike this Video because there are millions of people supporting these artists. But I still want to present you my opinion (for 2017). This is a part 3 to my original worst rappers of all time video. XXL Freshmen 2017 / XXL Freshman 2017 / New Rappers 2017 Worst Rapper Of All Time. Bad Rapper. Bad Rappers. Worst Rappers In The World. Worst Rap Lyrics. Wackest Rapper. Wackest Rappers. Wack Rapper. Wack Rappers. Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVKnbtnd0As Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDXbHeIGPfQ This is a part 3 to my original worst rappers of all time video. The 10 first rappers are in the 2017 XXL Freshman Class, those are Kamaiyah, A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie, PnB Rock, Madeintyo, Playboi Carti, Aminé, Kap G, Kyle, Ugly God and 10th Spot winner XXXTentacion. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 112605

Likes : 2069

DisLikes : 63

Published Date : 2017-12-16T19:28:56.000Z

EMINEM Vs. Benzino Beef / New EMINEM Vs. Old EMINEM / Evolution Of EMINEM Summer(Aug) 2002 - Eminem was out in Puerto Rico for the Mixtape Summit and for the promotion of his Movie 8 mile. He did a performance and after backstage Benzino tried to go over and talk to him. Eminem ignored him and said he didn't wanna talk to him because he was mad about his album not getting a 5 mic in Benzino's magazine The Source. Eminem later on does a interview and he's asked about what he thought about his album The Eminem Show being praised with a 4 mic rating. He began to diss The Source and even saying that they will never give him a 5 mic rating in their magazine. Blames this on Benzino. (Sept) 2002 - Benzino is in the studio of Hot97 in New York talking about the double standard in hip hop. And talks about how Eminem acted out in Puerto Rico. He dissed Eminem for the first time in a freestyle. Late(Sept) 2002 - While 50 Cent was a Guest DJ at Hot97 Eminem called in to promote 8 Mile as well as his new artist 50 Cent. During the Interview he disses Benzino calling him "Hasbenzino" and told them to play his record. And that they might have to dig in the trash to get it! Later that same night Benzino went to the studio and recorded a early version of the song "Pull your skirt up" Word about Benzino being heated with Eminem for dissing him on the radio comes out. Eminem has his manager and record exec's calling Benzino to squash the beef. Benzino releases the song a week or two later. Nov 2002 Eminem waits over a month and a half after "Pull Your Skirt up" came out and releases an entire Mixtape (The Invasion) dissing Benzino and The SOURCE. The mixtape had 4 diss tracks to Benzino("The Realest Label", "The Sauce", "Nail in the coffin" and Obie's "Welcome to Detriot City". Also Eminem says that he hasn't had his people call Benzino to squash the beef. The same month Benzino apears on BET's Rap City: Tha Bassment with Tigger to promote his new album Redemption. And talks about his beef with Eminem. 2 Weeks later after Eminem's Mixtape, Benzino releases "D. Another Day". 1 Week later Eminem does a interview on Hot97 with Angie dissing Benzino. 1 Week later Benzino releases Die Another Day Mixtape featuring all the disses he recorded including new song "Better Lose Yourself". Later that week he calls in Hot97 to do a interview with Angie. He yells at her for not staying neutral in the interview. And for letting Eminem continuosly degrade Benzino. Dec 2002 Benzino gets hate from Eminem fans. All radio stations with relations to Eminem drop Benzino songs. Jan 2003 The Source releases their Feb. Issue dissing Eminem. Feb 2003 Eminem releases the Benzino diss song "Go To Sleep". April 2003 Eminem releases the Mixtape Invasion 2 dissing Benzino in 4 songs("Conspiracy", "Doe Ray Me", "Keep Talkin" and "Wrong". June 2003 At Hot97's Summerjam Eminem disses Benzino and The SOURCE breaking his Source award on stage. Nov 2003 The Source holds a press conference and lets the media hear tapes in which Eminem raps a few controversial lines. The beef ended in 2004 when Eminem released his fifth album "Encore". Benzino dissed him one last time with "Built For This" but without a response, he stopped mentioning Eminem in later records. Benzino apologizes for his behavior in 2014. He is looking forward to a time where he and Eminem can laugh about their past feud. Hip-Hop Beefs Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxwRDuzSTRn6i3Dy8Z1kAldR ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 105871

Likes : 2273

DisLikes : 205

Published Date : 2017-08-12T16:00:05.000Z

Old School Rap Vs. New School / Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 71358

Likes : 1770

DisLikes : 111

Published Date : 2017-11-25T14:02:21.000Z

Mumble Rap Roast / Everyday Struggle / Joe Budden Show Lil Yachty joins Joe Budden and DJ Akademiks as our very first guest on Everyday Struggle, and this episode may be our most polarizing yet with Yachty and Budden going head-to-head to iron out their issues. Joe Budden now quits the Everyday Struggle show / Joe Budden Got fired from the Everyday Struggle show Quick backstory: - Lil Yachty unapologetically told Billboard he couldn't name five songs by legends Tupac and Notorious B.I.G., now he's calling Biggie "overrated." He added that Drake is better than 2Pac & Biggie Lil Yachty is now dissing Joe Budden with "Ice Tray". - Kodak Black said he is better than 2Pac & Biggie. He made fun of JAY-Z' lyrics. Kodak Black thinks he is more lyrical than 90s rappers. - Young Thug calls 2Pac fake on several social media sites. He thinks that 2Pac has done nothing for his community. Wyclef Jean says Young Thug is the modern 2Pac. - 21 Savage calls out 'OG Rappers' criticizing the new generation. He thinks that "Old Heads" are hypocrites and that his generation (Mumble Rappers) has made Hip-Hop better than ever. - Lil Uzi Vert calls out "Old N's" (Old School Rappers & Fans) on Instagram. He says they are fake and scared that "young N's" take over the game. - Migos called 50 Cent old and irrelevant. They also wanted their 44 Bodyguards to take on Joe Budden at the BET Awards 2017. Migos are disrespecting the older generation of rappers and fans. Migos are now dissing Joe Budden with "Ice Tray". - Desiigner is cool. Hip-Hop Roast Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxwFamWwOriPMkF21e4Up1J_ ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 180452

Likes : 2495

DisLikes : 111

Published Date : 2017-11-04T15:00:00.000Z

2Pac Vs. JAY-Z Beef / JAY-Z Vs. 2Pac Battle / 2Pac JAY-Z Diss Tupac didn’t have as big a feud with Jay Z as he did with The Notorious B.I.G., but the two were definitely at odds at one point. 2Pac's beef with JAY-Z started after 2Pac heard the rumor that JAY-Z was dissing the West Coast. After 2Pac recorded his verses for "Hit 'Em Up" he added a message at the end of the song. He was dissing JAY-Z before he took it off the record. 2Pac wanted to hear JAY-Z' album "Reasonable Doubt" before he decided to diss him. "Reasonable Doubt" had 2 songs that Pac took offense to: "Brooklyn's Finest" (with Biggie) and "22 Two's". Pac decided to diss JAY-Z on the Makaveli album, he passed away before the album was released. JAY-Z disses 2Pac after he heard "The Don Killuminati: The 7 Day Theory" and after his opponent passed away. He recorded a song called "D*ad Or Alive" in which he responds to Pac's "Bomb First". 2Pac had already recorded about 10 songs to respond to a possible response from JAY. Even a decade after their beef ended you still hear a new song coming out every year that could be a diss against JAY-Z. You might recall, Pac -- who d*ed in 1996 -- dissed Hova on the posthumous “B*mb First (My Second Reply)” and "F**k Friendz." Apparently, Jigga was prepared for a war of words with Shakur, as well. At least that’s what DJ Clark Kent, a longtime JAY-Z producer, told A Waste Of Time With ItsTheReal during an interview published Wednesday (Aug. 12). "It never came out out of respect for the fact that he d*ed," Kent said. "Jay did a record going at Pac, but just as it was about to come out, son d*ed...We performed it, though. We performed it once. You have to understand. The chip on Jay’s shoulder is so crazy, it’s just like he had to perform it.” According to Kent, Jigga played the cut during a show at The Apollo in Harlem. “It was scathing,” he said. "Crowds was like, ‘Oh, sh*t.’ It was super hard. If he was alive, there would have been no coming back...This was so tough. To me, it probably was one of the hardest dis records I’ve ever heard.” Although they didn't see eye-to-eye at the time, Hova's perspective changed after the "California Love" MC's d*ath. Jay -- who later sampled Tupac's "Me And My Girlfriend" for his Beyoncé-assisted "'03 Bonnie & Clyde" single -- would go on to say he held no ill will towards Shakur. "It was nothing personal," the Roc boss told MTV News in 2007. "We never met. You know, he and Big went through their thing. I was Big's man, that was the extent of our big beef. Whatever [animosity] we had d*ed with him." JAY-Z' beef with 2Pac ended after 2Pac passed away. He continued to pay homage to Pac at live events and on various occasions. Hip-Hop Beefs Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxwRDuzSTRn6i3Dy8Z1kAldR ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Endless Jess

Views : 7673

Likes : 950

DisLikes : 75

Published Date : 2018-04-20T22:44:08.000Z

Someone had to say it. https://www.patreon.com/endlessjess
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 105340

Likes : 2321

DisLikes : 94

Published Date : 2017-09-02T16:00:04.000Z

East Coast Rap Vs. West Coast Rap / East Coast Hip-Hop Vs. West Coast Hip-Hop / East Vs. West We are comparing both styles without restarting the East Coast West Coast beef The East Coast–West Coast hip hop rivalry was a feud from 1991 to 1997 between artists and fans of the East Coast hip hop and West Coast hip hop scenes in the United States, especially from 1994 to 1997. Focal points of the feud were East Coast-based rapper The Notorious B.I.G. (and his New York-based label, Bad Boy Records) and West Coast-based rapper Tupac Shakur (and his Los Angeles-based label, Death Row Records), who became symbols of the East Coast/West Coast feud. As it was originally known, hip hop was a movement in New York City in the late 1970s and early 1980s. It revolved around four key areas: MCing (now known as rapping), DJing, graffiti art and b-boying (breakdancing). While all four areas were important, the two that we will focus on are MCing and DJing, as they have the most relevance to both to audio and hip hop. Hip hop’s roots come from a DJ scratching a record to create a looped beat while an MC raps along to the beat. While much has changed over the years, the essential idea of rapping to a looped beat is still the foundation for most hip hop songs. Many music producers still follow these old techniques, loading up an old soul record and creating a new track. However, hip hop advanced beyond this in 1983 when Afrika Bambaataa and the Soulsonic Force began using synthesizers and drum machines to create entirely new tracks. While there is much that took place along with this, and many artists such as Run-DMC, LL Cool J and others helped to define the genre, let’s fast-forward to 1987. In 1987, in Compton, CA, an important move was taking place. Where previously hip hop had been politically and socially motivated, a new sub-genre was forming: gangsta rap. A group known as N.W.A., consisting of Dr. Dre, MC Ren, Ice Cube and Eazy-E released an album titled “Straight Outta Compton.” Dr. Dre provided the production for the album, consisting almost entirely of rolling basslines and drums. Straight Outta Compton was a smashing hit. While the group eventually disbanded over financial disputes, N.W.A.’s legacy would help shape the future. Dr. Dre would later sign with Suge Knight’s Death Row Records, along with an up-and coming rapper named Tupac Shakur, ushering in the era of West Coast Gangsta Rap. Dre remains quite influential in the industry today, widely recognized as a pioneer in hip hop and music production. Meanwhile, back on the East Coast, a similar movement was happening. Perhaps most notable was Sean “Puffy” Combs’ departure from Uptown Records, taking newly signed rapper The Notorious B.I.G. (Biggie) with him to found Bad Boy Records. Bad Boy Records was competing with Suge Knight’s West Coast powerhouse D*ath Row Records. This, while not immediately, would lead to the downfall of gangsta rap as a genre, and move hip hop into the popular music genre where it remains today. Let’s end the history lesson here. There is much more that could be said, with artists along the way that I have overlooked, but this is just meant to be a brief outline to provide context. Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 285043

Likes : 7091

DisLikes : 603

Published Date : 2017-07-29T16:00:01.000Z

Best New School Rappers / Best Rappers Of The New School / Top 10 New School Rappers Hip hop heads, who are the best new school rappers? Mainstream rap keeps changing over the years with gangsta rap becoming more underground, while trap music quickly rose in popularity. Regardless of rap's evolution, the best current rappers still have powerful lyrics, catchy hooks, and good beats. Which rapper is currently at the top of the hip hop game? People often complain about the lack of lyricists in Hip Hop’s new generation. While the lyrically proficient MCs might not be getting the major looks like their melodic counterparts, they’re still out there and dropping excellent music worthy of recognition. With back-to-school season in full effect, Hip-Hop Universe has donned the teacher’s cap and put together a lesson plan on some of the new school’s finest rappers. While this isn’t the definitive lineup of the best rappers of this generation, it should give readers an idea of who’s out there. Plenty of rappers deserve some shine, so think of this as the opening chapter of the Hip Hop fan’s textbook on the new class. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : KRD 1999

Views : 425

Likes : 18

DisLikes : 4

Published Date : 2017-08-31T15:29:28.000Z

    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 664828

Likes : 6580

DisLikes : 374

Published Date : 2017-11-29T21:25:23.000Z

JAY-Z Cheats On Beyonce / JAY-Z David Letterman Netflix / JAY-Z New York Times Interview Dean Baquet By DEAN BAQUET NOV. 29, 2017 My conversation with Jay-Z began with O.J. When I was a kid growing up in black New Orleans in the 1960s, O.J. Simpson was a god. We imitated his moves, his swagger. We didn’t want to just play like him. We wanted to be him, gorgeous and running in the California sun. We practiced his juking moves in the mirror, our hands too small to hold the ball loosely, the way he did. We even wanted to go to U.S.C., where he led the nation in rushing two years in a row. We were angry when he lost the Heisman Trophy to the white, All-American, clean-cut U.C.L.A. quarterback Gary Beban, known as “The Great One.” We were triumphant when he won it the next year. But O.J. was not a perfect hero for young black boys, even though he launched himself from poverty in San Francisco to superstardom. He was racially ambivalent. At a time when other athletes were starting to make their blackness a cause, he was trying to make his a footnote. So when I was invited to interview Jay-Z, I wanted to talk about his song “The Story of O.J.,” from his most recent album, “4:44,” in which he quotes the legendary, maybe apocryphal, Simpson line “I’m not black, I’m O.J.” I was less engaged by the rapper’s marital troubles or his infamous, caught-on-video 2014 elevator dust-up with his sister-in-law. But I did want to try to understand how, with an $88 million Bel Air mansion a freeway ride from neighborhoods where black people endure with so little, Jay-Z holds onto his younger self — a black man who grew up in the ’70s in the Marcy projects of Brooklyn. It seemed from his new body of work that examining this high-wire act of straddling two places had been stirring more deeply within him — much the way it stirs in me, a Southern black man who grew up revering O.J. and whose own success is infinitely greater than anyone in my early life would have imagined for me. What is it about the story of O.J. Simpson that moved us both? O.J. must have locked down part of himself when he presented himself as the noncontroversial star who never talked about race, the perfect foil for his fellow football player, Cleveland Browns running back Jim Brown, who seemed more threatening, angry. I had to wonder if the pressure of that denial caused him to explode decades later. All of this was on my mind when I met with Jay-Z for two hours in an executive office at The Times this past September. Besides O.J. and racial identity, we talked about his mother’s sexuality, and how he could possibly raise socially aware children who shuttled between mansions: After years of rapping about growing up in the ‘hood, he has produced an album that sounds like a middle-aged black man’s deeply introspective therapy session put to music. This interview has been edited and condensed. Annotations by Wesley Morris, critic at large for The New York Times, and Reggie Ugwu, pop culture reporter for The New York Times. Hip-Hop Universe Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxx3Dp3HVCp06r03jCdaoaYA ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 34700

Likes : 1407

DisLikes : 24

Published Date : 2017-10-26T16:00:06.000Z

Evolution Of Wu-Tang Clan / Best Wu-Tang Clan Songs / Method Man Songs Wu-Tang Clan just released another album call "The Saga Continues". This video shows the history of the Wu-Tang Clan from 1992 all the way to 2017. The Wu-Tang Clan is an American hip hop group from Staten Island, New York City, originally composed of East Coast rappers RZA, GZA, Ol' Dirty Bastard, Method Man, Raekwon, Ghostface Killah, Inspectah Deck, U-God and Masta Killa. Cappadonna later became an official member of the group. The Wu-Tang Clan has released four gold and platinum studio albums. Its 1993 debut album, Enter the Wu-Tang (36 Chambers), is considered to be one of the greatest albums in hip-hop history. The Wu-Tang Clan has introduced and launched the careers of a number of affiliated artists and groups, often collectively known as the Wu-Tang Killa Bees, and has been described as one of the most influential hip-hop groups of all-time. In 2008, About ranked them "the No. 1 greatest hip hop group of all time". Kris Ex of Rolling Stone called Wu-Tang Clan "the best rap group ever". In 2004, NME hailed them as one of the most influential groups of the last ten years. Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 62975

Likes : 1576

DisLikes : 79

Published Date : 2017-03-29T09:48:03.000Z

EMINEM Coachella 2018 / Old EMINEM Vs. New EMINEM / Best EMINEM Songs / Evolution Of EMINEM Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), known professionally as Eminem (often stylized as EMINƎM), is an American rapper, songwriter, record producer, and actor. Eminem is the best-selling artist of the 2000s in the United States. Throughout his career, he has had 10 number-one albums on the Billboard 200 and five number-one singles on the Billboard Hot 100. With US sales of 47.4 million albums and 42 million tracks as of June 2014, Eminem is the second best-selling male artist of the Nielsen SoundScan era, the sixth best-selling artist in the United States and the best-selling hip-hop artist. Globally, he has sold more than 245 million albums, making him one of the world's best-selling artists. Additionally, he is is the only artist to have eight albums consecutively debut at No. 1 on the Billboard 200. Rolling Stone ranked him 83rd on its list of 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, calling him the King of Hip Hop. After his debut album Infinite (1996) and then Slim Shady EP (1997), Eminem signed with Dr. Dre's Aftermath Entertainment and subsequently achieved mainstream popularity in 1999 with The Slim Shady LP, which earned him his first Grammy Award for Best Rap Album. His next two releases, 2000's The Marshall Mathers LP and 2002's The Eminem Show, were worldwide successes, with each being certified diamond in U.S. sales, and both winning Best Rap Album Grammy Awards—making Eminem the first artist to win the award for three consecutive LPs. They were followed by Encore in 2004, another critical and commercial success. Eminem went on hiatus after touring in 2005, releasing Relapse in 2009 and Recovery in 2010. Both won Grammy Awards and Recovery was the best-selling album of 2010 worldwide, the second time he had the international best-selling album of the year (after The Eminem Show). Eminem's eighth album, 2013's The Marshall Mathers LP 2, won two Grammy Awards, including Best Rap Album; it expanded his record for the most wins in that category and his Grammy total to 15. In 2017, he released his ninth studio album, Revival. In addition to his solo career, Eminem is an original member of the Midwest hip hop groups Soul Intent and D12. He is also known for his collaborations with fellow Detroit-based rapper Royce da 5'9"; the two are collectively known as Bad Meets Evil. Eminem has developed other ventures, including Shady Records, with manager Paul Rosenberg, which helped launch the careers of artists such as 50 Cent. Eminem has also established his own channel, Shade 45, on Sirius XM Radio. In November 2002, he starred in the hip hop film 8 Mile, which won the Academy Award for Best Original Song, for "Lose Yourself", becoming the first rap artist to ever win the award. Eminem has made cameo appearances in the films The Wash (2001), Funny People (2009), The Interview (2014) and the television series Entourage (2010). Top 50 EMINEM Songs / EMINEM'S Greatest Hits / Best Songs Of EMINEM / Best EMINEM Songs Of All Time Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 415641

Likes : 8085

DisLikes : 277

Published Date : 2017-05-14T19:40:29.000Z

East Coast Rap Vs. West Coast Rap / East Coast Hip-Hop Vs. West Coast Hip-Hop We are comparing both styles without restarting the East Coast West Coast beef The East Coast–West Coast hip hop rivalry was a feud from 1991 to 1997 between artists and fans of the East Coast hip hop and West Coast hip hop scenes in the United States, especially from 1994 to 1997. Focal points of the feud were East Coast-based rapper The Notorious B.I.G. (and his New York-based label, Bad Boy Records) and West Coast-based rapper Tupac Shakur (and his Los Angeles-based label, Death Row Records), who became symbols of the East Coast/West Coast feud. As it was originally known, hip hop was a movement in New York City in the late 1970s and early 1980s. It revolved around four key areas: MCing (now known as rapping), DJing, graffiti art and b-boying (breakdancing). While all four areas were important, the two that we will focus on are MCing and DJing, as they have the most relevance to both to audio and hip hop. Hip hop’s roots come from a DJ scratching a record to create a looped beat while an MC raps along to the beat. While much has changed over the years, the essential idea of rapping to a looped beat is still the foundation for most hip hop songs. Many music producers still follow these old techniques, loading up an old soul record and creating a new track. However, hip hop advanced beyond this in 1983 when Afrika Bambaataa and the Soulsonic Force began using synthesizers and drum machines to create entirely new tracks. While there is much that took place along with this, and many artists such as Run-DMC, LL Cool J and others helped to define the genre, let’s fast-forward to 1987. In 1987, in Compton, CA, an important move was taking place. Where previously hip hop had been politically and socially motivated, a new sub-genre was forming: gangsta rap. A group known as N.W.A., consisting of Dr. Dre, MC Ren, Ice Cube and Eazy-E released an album titled “Straight Outta Compton.” Dr. Dre provided the production for the album, consisting almost entirely of rolling basslines and drums. Straight Outta Compton was a smashing hit. While the group eventually disbanded over financial disputes, N.W.A.’s legacy would help shape the future. Dr. Dre would later sign with Suge Knight’s Death Row Records, along with an up-and coming rapper named Tupac Shakur, ushering in the era of West Coast Gangsta Rap. Dre remains quite influential in the industry today, widely recognized as a pioneer in hip hop and music production. Meanwhile, back on the East Coast, a similar movement was happening. Perhaps most notable was Sean “Puffy” Combs’ departure from Uptown Records, taking newly signed rapper The Notorious B.I.G. (Biggie) with him to found Bad Boy Records. Bad Boy Records was competing with Suge Knight’s West Coast powerhouse D*ath Row Records. This, while not immediately, would lead to the downfall of gangsta rap as a genre, and move hip hop into the popular music genre where it remains today. Let’s end the history lesson here. There is much more that could be said, with artists along the way that I have overlooked, but this is just meant to be a brief outline to provide context. Additionally, the closer we move to our present time, the harder it becomes to analyze the music from a historical standpoint. Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 249913

Likes : 3980

DisLikes : 121

Published Date : 2017-10-14T17:38:20.000Z

2Pac Vs. Nas Beef / Nas Vs. 2Pac Battle / 2Pac And Nas Beef 2Pac's Beef With Nas / Nas' Beef With 2Pac Due to faults of his own, rapper Nas got caught up in the East vs Westcoast beef. Which of course Tupac wouldn’t of liked as it initially had nothing to do with Nas. Tupac and Nas met each other at the House of Blues, where Tupac and Nas talked about this whole beef situation. Tupac told Nas that he was in no way involved and that he should not get caught up in it because he and Death Row had nothing but love for him. But then, Tupac listened to Nas’ songs and he remarked that there was a song, “The Message”, in which Nas was talking about fake thugs and it sounded as if Nas was talking about Tupac. Nas also liked to talk a lot about Thug Life after Pac introduced it to the whole world, which pissed Tupac off because he was the man to represent it. Tupac accused Nas of biting his style and stealing his life for his songs. Nas even has a tattoo in the same place of Tupac’s Thug Life tattoo, and wore no shirt and his bandana in a similar way to pac in the video for ‘Hate Me Now’. Tupac dissed Nas on songs like “Against all Odds” and in interviews, such as the interview about Death Row East. But after Tupac’s demise Nas claimed they squashed their beef, which is supported by the Outlawz, and Nas even featured on ‘Thugz Mansion‘ on Tupac’s posthumus album ‘Better Dayz’. Nas - The Message It was released during the feud between the East and West Coast. The West Coast hip hop artist 2Pac viewed the first lyrics of the song "Fake thug, no love, you get the slug, CB4 Gusto, your luck low, I didn't know till I was drunk though" as a subliminal diss and responded in two songs from his last album whilst alive, The Don Killuminati: The 7 Day Theory: "Bomb First" and "Against All Odds". Although the two rappers purportedly reconciled before 2Pac's demise, 2Pac was never able to edit the lyrics against Nas due to his passing. 2Pac - Against All Odds The final track on The 7 Day Theory, “Against All Odds” is one of the most revealing songs about the East Coast–West Coast war. Unlike “Hit Em Up,” which was a more personal, emotional, attack on Biggie and his record label, Against All Odds is more significant in terms of the subject matter. What repercussions 2Pac would have suffered for recording the track will never be known (“Probably be m*rdered for the sh*t that I said”) as he was k*lled before the song was released. Nevertheless, “Against All Odds” remains one of the greatest narratives of the East Coast–West Coast war. Hip-Hop Beefs Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxwRDuzSTRn6i3Dy8Z1kAldR ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 648119

Likes : 9416

DisLikes : 1502

Published Date : 2017-03-15T11:43:11.000Z

Old School Rap Vs. New School / Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 102849

Likes : 2618

DisLikes : 214

Published Date : 2018-03-19T16:45:05.000Z

Mumble Rap Vs Lyrical Rap / Overrated Rappers Vs. Underrated Rappers / Old School Rap Vs. New School Rap Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. These phases can be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 9034

Likes : 667

DisLikes : 14

Published Date : 2018-03-09T17:00:09.000Z

The Notorious B.I.G. 21st Anniversary / Biggie Tribute / Biggie Rare Interview Born and raised in New York’s Brooklyn borough, Biggie Smalls made an impact on the rap game by age 20, introducing a bravado, flow and slow-and-steady storytelling ability that was unlike anything else out at the time. Biggie was known for his signature flow: a type of delivery that would bend syllables and rhyme structure in a way intriguing to the listener. He also let fans in on his inner thoughts, emotions and outlook on life, proving he was more than a hood rich former d. dealer out for the dough. Big’s only two albums, 1994’s Ready to Die and 1997’s Life After D*ath, are markers in hip-hop history as classic albums. Other than his rhymes, Big was a larger-than-life character. A natural star, Big made it cool to dress in everything from Coogi sweaters to a three-piece all-white suit and a cane. But with the Black Frank White sadly being g*nned down while he was at his peak as a star, rap fans will never really know how much more he could’ve changed the game. As the hip-hop world remembers the late great entertainer, rappers have been sharing memories and pictures of Big on social media all day. From Biggie’s close friends and business partners like Diddy and Lil Cease to rappers who grew up on his discography, the Notorious B.I.G.’s legacy has undoubtedly lived on for 21 years. Hip Hop Remembers Biggie Smalls On 21st Anniversary Of His D*ath Christopher George Latore Wallace (May 21, 1972 – March 9, 1997), better known by his stage names The Notorious B.I.G., Biggie, or Biggie Smalls, was an American rapper. He is consistently ranked as one of the greatest and most influential rappers of all time. Wallace was raised in the Brooklyn borough of New York City. When he released his debut album Ready to D*e in 1994, he became a central figure in the East Coast hip hop scene and increased New York's visibility in the genre at a time when West Coast hip hop was dominant in the mainstream. The following year, Wallace led his childhood friends to chart success through his protégé group, Junior M.A.F.I.A. While recording his second album, Wallace was heavily involved in the growing East Coast–West Coast hip hop feud. On March 9, 1997, Wallace was k. by an unknown as**ilant in a drive-by sh**ting in Los Angeles. His double-disc album Life After D, released 16 days later, rose to No. 1 on the U.S. album charts and was certified Diamond in 2000 by the Recording Industry Association of America, one of the few hip hop albums to receive this certification. Wallace was noted for his "loose, easy flow", dark semi-autobiographical lyrics and storytelling abilities, sometimes changing his pitch on songs. Two more albums have been released since his d*ath. He has certified sales of 17 million units in the United States. Considered one of the best artists in hip hop music, Wallace was described by AllMusic as "the savior of East Coast hip-hop". The Source magazine named Wallace the greatest rapper of all time in its 150th issue in 2002. In 2003, when XXL magazine asked several hip hop artists to list their five favorite MCs, Wallace's name appeared on more rappers' lists than anyone else. In 2006, MTV ranked him at No. 3 on their list of The Greatest MCs of All Time, calling him possibly "the most skillful ever on the mic". Editors of About.com ranked him No. 3 on their list of the Top 50 MCs of Our Time (1987–2007). In 2012, The Source ranked him No. 3 on their list of the Top 50 Lyrical Leaders of all time. Rolling Stone has referred to him as the "greatest rapper that ever lived". In 2015, Billboard named Wallace as the greatest rapper of all time. Wallace's lyrics have been sampled and quoted by a variety of hip hop, R&B and pop artists including Jay-Z, 50 Cent, Alicia Keys, Fat Joe, Nelly, Ja Rule, Eminem, Lil Wayne, Game, Clinton Sparks, Michael Jackson and Usher. On August 28, 2005, at the 2005 MTV Video Music Awards, Sean Combs (then using the rap alias "P. Diddy") and Snoop Dogg paid tribute to Wallace: an orchestra played while the vocals from "Juicy" and "Warning" played on the arena speakers. In September 2005, VH1 held its second annual "Hip Hop Honors", with a tribute to Wallace headlining the show. Hip-Hop Universe Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxx3Dp3HVCp06r03jCdaoaYA ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 297160

Likes : 5842

DisLikes : 760

Published Date : 2018-03-17T18:14:57.000Z

Best Hip-Hop Song Each Year / Best Hip-Hop Songs Of All Time / If You Rap You Lose The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 591848

Likes : 8138

DisLikes : 349

Published Date : 2018-04-16T15:08:50.000Z

EMINEM Coachella 2018 / Beyonce Coachella 2018 / COLLEGE KIDS REACT TO COACHELLA 2018 (Beychella, Eminem, Walmart Yodel Boy) EMINEM brings out Dr. Dre & 50 Cent live at Coachella 2018. This year’s Coachella headliners have been quite something, The Weeknd kicking off the weekend with a hit-packed set while Beyoncé blew everyone away with a stunning show. Songs that EMINEM performed: 2:37 Meicine man 3:41 Till I collapse 5:30 3 a.m 6:19 Square dance 7:13 Kill you 8:18 Sing for the moment 11:00 White America 11:50 Rap God 13:05 Soldier 13:34 Just don't give a fuck 14:00 Criminal 14:08 The way I am 14:52 Walk on water 16:08 Stan 16:53 Love the way you lie 17:37 Patiently waiting and 50 Cent appears 18:37 In da club 20:06 The monster 20:21 River 23:08 My name is 24:37 The real slim shady 25:13 Dr Dre appears 25:36 Still D.R.E 26:59 Nuthin' but a 'G' thang 29:00 Forgot about Dre 29:19 Crack a bottle 29:53 Not Afraid 34:37 Lose yourself Sunday saw Eminem take to the stage, bringing along four key guests. First up was Bebe Rexha, who performed “The Monster,” a song she co-wrote but was originally performed by Rhianna. Next was 50 Cent, who performed the Get Rich or Die Tryin’ track “Patiently Waiting” with Eminem, before launching into snippets of “My Life” and “In da Club”. Skylar Grey sang on multiple tracks, filling in for Dido on “Stan,” previous headliner Beyoncé on “Walk on Water,” and Rihanna on “Love The Way You Lie.” Finally came Dr. Dre, who previously appeared alongside Eminem when the rapper headlined Coachella in 2012. The duo began with “Still Dre” before launching into “Medicine Man” and “Forgot About Dre”. Eminem also filled in for Snoop Dogg on "Nothing But A G Thang" and Tupac on "California Love". Watch snippets of the performances below. Eminem and 50 Cent perform onstage during the 2018 Coachella Valley Music and Arts Festival Weekend 1 at the Empire Polo Field on April 15, 2018 in Indio, Calif. After watching The Weeknd and Beyoncè torch their respective sets with smoldering efforts, on Sunday night (April 15), Eminem added the finishing touches to what was a memorable first weekend at Coachella 2018. The venerated MC had the daunting task of following up after Beyoncè — who dazzled during her impeccable performance Saturday night (April 14) — and seemed prepared for the challenge. While Shady didn’t have a troupe of talented dancers in tow like Queen B, his lyrical gymnastics left an indelible mark. First, he delved deep into his discography and performed a multitude of cuts from his 2005 opus, The Eminem Show, including "Til' I Collapse," "Square Dance," "White America," and "Sing for the Moment." Hungry to showcase his dexterity on the grandest stage of Coachella, Shady unabashedly dived into "Rap God." The Marshall Mathers 2 standout proved to be a winner for his avid supporters, as they gushed every time Em flexed his highly-touted machine-gun flow. "I heard y'all like when Eminem is angry," yelled Porter before his Shady cohort segued into his remix for "Chlroaseptic." The raucous crowd beamed joyously, watching Em aggressively pummel the Mr. Porter-produced track with vigor. Once he finished, Em jumped back to the classics, but with help from frequent collaborator, Skylar Grey. Grey sauntered onto the stage and began singing the hook to the Beyonce-assisted track "Walk on Water." As Em bared his soul for the crowd in attendance, the violinists amplified the somberness of the performance with their precision. The tandem of Em and Grey continued to shred through his catalog, later joining forces on "Stan" and "Love the Way You Lie." Later, Dr. Dre joined in on the action and graced the stage to perform with Shady. The chemistry between Dre and Em was alive and well, as the iconic pair orchestrated their '90s collaboration "Forgot About Dre." Later, Em upped the ante and recited Snoop Dogg's verse for "Nothing But a G Thang" with his long-time friend and collaborator. The staggering rendition earned a wave of claps and cheers, giving Em more energy to finish out his set strong. Hip-Hop Universe Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxx3Dp3HVCp06r03jCdaoaYA ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 11272

Likes : 317

DisLikes : 10

Published Date : 2018-01-13T17:19:22.000Z

LL Cool J Canibus Beef / Canibus Vs. LL Cool J / LL Cool J Vs. Canibus LL Cool J released the b side of his single Father titled 4, 3, 2, 1 of his album "Phenomenon" in 1997. Backed by seasoned vets such as Method Man, Redman and LL himself blazing mics. What made this track so special was that it also introduced two young and hungry rappers by the name of DMX and Canibus into the scene. But during the recording of the 4, 3, 2, 1, things didn’t get off on a right track. Canibus original verse made reference to LL’s mic on his arm and asked if he can borrow that. And the LL Cool J & Canibus Beef broke out. Clearly feeling angry, confused, and a bit betrayed, Canibus wanted to go clearly at LL’s head but he also had to remind himself of the possible consequences he can risk by making this move. One of them being that he’s not only going against LL Cool J, He’s also going against a brand of Def Jam and someone with a legendary status. It’s also the fact that he could be blackballed so with all of those factors, Canibus agreed to try to talk to LL on an unauthorized phone conversation to settle the dispute. The conversation itself showcased Canibus showing humility to LL which could further cause more damage to his credibility as an MC. LL would suggest that he and Canibus would squash the issue, do an underground track together showing unity and nobody would ever know who he’s talking about. That never happened. Canibus felt his back against the wall. During the time, If a self-proclaimed battle MC didn’t respond to another MC, He was looked upon as soft or looked upon as a total coward. Canibus took the gamble and responded to LL’s 4, 3, 2, 1, Verse with possibly one of the most vicious battle tracks of All Time. Canibus fully went into LL’s jugular: Took aim at his credibility as an MC, His contradictions as a so-called role model, How he abandoned his hardcore style, and most notably the line about him having only female Fans. The buzz and anticipation for his debut album became even higher with the release of 2nd Round KO. Many people at the time thought it was over for LL. 2nd Round Ko pushed LL into a corner to respond. Considering he created this hysteria himself, He had it coming. Even in interviews LL said he wasn’t gonna respond, People should have known he was lying because he released his response to 2nd Round Ko titled The Ripper Strikes Back off the Survival Of the Fittest mixtape. LL’s flow and energy was more magnetic and at the same energetic. He even sounded more ferocious than he has in years. He basically took on all 3 of his combatants (Wyclef, Canibus, and even Mike Tyson) in Break of Dawn Fashion. People may have thought that it was weak but LL had some left in the tank when he delivered such blows to his adversaries. On paper, It looked basic and weak but he made up alot of it with his energy. He did a great job of cleverly flipping some of the lines Canibus threw at him and it also re-juiced LL’s career. Canibus on the other hand suffered a rare sorority of beginners luck as his debut album would be a total disappointment and not what the fans who were served hardcore lyrical acrobats as appetizers ordered. Many of the album’s flaws is due to Wyclef’s ear for production and it didn’t do much to carry Canibus’s style. This literally set Canibus’s career back while LL’s flourished during this moment. Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=THAo1Mw-evE Hip-Hop Beefs Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxwRDuzSTRn6i3Dy8Z1kAldR ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 61019

Likes : 2188

DisLikes : 324

Published Date : 2018-03-30T14:00:00.000Z

EMINEM Coachella 2018 / Old EMINEM Vs. New EMINEM / EMINEM Discography Ranking / Evolution Of EMINEM Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), known professionally as EMINEM (often stylized as EMINƎM), is an American rapper, songwriter, record producer, and actor. EMINEM is the best-selling artist of the 2000s in the United States. Throughout his career, he has had 10 number-one albums on the Billboard 200 and five number-one singles on the Billboard Hot 100. With US sales of 47.4 million albums and 42 million tracks as of June 2014, EMINEM is the second best-selling male artist of the Nielsen SoundScan era, the sixth best-selling artist in the United States and the best-selling hip-hop artist. Globally, he has sold more than 172 million albums, making him one of the world's best-selling artists. Rolling Stone ranked him 83rd on its list of 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, calling him the King of Hip Hop. After his debut album Infinite (1996) and the Slim Shady EP (1997), EMINEM signed with Dr. Dre's Aftermath Entertainment and subsequently achieved mainstream popularity in 1999 with The Slim Shady LP, which earned him his first Grammy Award for Best Rap Album. His next two releases, 2000's The Marshall Mathers LP and 2002's The EMINEM Show, were worldwide successes, with each being certified diamond in U.S. sales, and both winning Best Rap Album Grammy Awards—making EMINEM the first artist to win the award for three consecutive LPs. They were followed by Encore in 2004, another critical and commercial success. EMINEM went on hiatus after touring in 2005, releasing Relapse in 2009 and Recovery in 2010. Both won Grammy Awards and Recovery was the best-selling album of 2010 worldwide, the second time he had the international best-selling album of the year (after The EMINEM Show). EMINEM's eighth album, 2013's The Marshall Mathers LP 2, won two Grammy Awards, including Best Rap Album; it expanded his record for the most wins in that category and his Grammy total to 15. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzT_ttW0hMFnheKnJ3ibV7s ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 482400

Likes : 10391

DisLikes : 674

Published Date : 2018-03-22T20:02:24.000Z

Most Poplular Rap Songs / Songs That Made Rappers Famous / If You Rap You Lose Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. These phases can be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 835625

Likes : 22252

DisLikes : 308

Published Date : 2017-11-11T14:00:09.000Z

EMINEM Coachella 2018 / New EMINEM Vs. Old EMINEM / Evolution Of EMINEM / Best EMINEM Songs Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), known professionally as EMINEM (often stylized as EMINƎM), is an American rapper, songwriter, record producer, and actor. EMINEM is the best-selling artist of the 2000s in the United States. Throughout his career, he has had 10 number-one albums on the Billboard 200 and five number-one singles on the Billboard Hot 100. With US sales of 47.4 million albums and 42 million tracks as of June 2014, EMINEM is the second best-selling male artist of the Nielsen SoundScan era, the sixth best-selling artist in the United States and the best-selling hip-hop artist. Globally, he has sold more than 172 million albums, making him one of the world's best-selling artists. Rolling Stone ranked him 83rd on its list of 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, calling him the King of Hip Hop. After his debut album Infinite (1996) and the Slim Shady EP (1997), EMINEM signed with Dr. Dre's Aftermath Entertainment and subsequently achieved mainstream popularity in 1999 with The Slim Shady LP, which earned him his first Grammy Award for Best Rap Album. His next two releases, 2000's The Marshall Mathers LP and 2002's The EMINEM Show, were worldwide successes, with each being certified diamond in U.S. sales, and both winning Best Rap Album Grammy Awards—making EMINEM the first artist to win the award for three consecutive LPs. They were followed by Encore in 2004, another critical and commercial success. EMINEM went on hiatus after touring in 2005, releasing Relapse in 2009 and Recovery in 2010. Both won Grammy Awards and Recovery was the best-selling album of 2010 worldwide, the second time he had the international best-selling album of the year (after The EMINEM Show). EMINEM's eighth album, 2013's The Marshall Mathers LP 2, won two Grammy Awards, including Best Rap Album; it expanded his record for the most wins in that category and his Grammy total to 15. EMINEM has developed other ventures, including Shady Records, with manager Paul Rosenberg, which helped launch the careers of artists such as 50 Cent. EMINEM has also established his own channel, Shade 45, on Sirius XM Radio. In November 2002, he starred in the hip hop film 8 Mile, which won the Academy Award for Best Original Song, for "Lose Yourself", becoming the first rap artist to ever win the award. EMINEM has made cameo appearances in the films The Wash (2001), Funny People (2009), The Interview (2014) and the television series Entourage (2010). Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : jboy react gang

Views : 718

Likes : 16

DisLikes : 3

Published Date : 2017-05-04T02:12:25.000Z

Hip hop universe. https://m.youtube.com/channel/UCKOlU7SLdtqmOx1w0nyAPtw^^^^^^ ^^^^^ IG:superstatic2
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 268627

Likes : 4358

DisLikes : 595

Published Date : 2017-06-30T18:38:01.000Z

Old School Rap Vs. New School / Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 9356

Likes : 504

DisLikes : 11

Published Date : 2018-01-20T15:28:58.000Z

2Pac Interview 1992 / 2Pac BET Interview / 2Pac Tanya Hart Interview Tupac Shakur (2Pac) on Live from L.A. with Host Tanya Hart in 1992. Original uploader "Classic Hip Hop Storage Box": https://youtu.be/UVUwr1LFWow 20 year old Tupac (2Pac) Amaru Shakur, being interviewed by Tanya Hart on Live from L.A. shortly after the release of the movie "Juice", his acting debut, in 1992. Tupac discusses his parents including his Mom, Afeni Shakur, the Black Panther Party philosophy, his controversial lyrics and the LA Riots. Los Angeles, CA — In February 1992 Tanya Hart conducted the first television interview with 2Pac on BET’s Live from LA with Tanya Hart. Clips from this interview were used in the 2003 Oscar nominated Best Documentary Feature Film Tupac: Resurrection. This BET Tanya-2Pac interview has gone viral on various online outlets over the past 20 years. On April 7, 2Pac will be inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.Snoop Dogg will do the formal induction speech on behalf of his late friend and former label mate 2Pac. Tanya Hart set up the BET west coast studio operations in 1990 at the request of BET founder Robert Johnson and launched several of its first west coast programs including Live from LA with Tanya Hart and Screen Scene. Other African American stars who were interviewed on Live from LA with Tanya Hart include, Ice Cube, Halle Berry, Will Smith, Al Haymon, Smokey Robinson, Wilt Chamberlain, John Singleton, and other notables. Hip-Hop Universe Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxx3Dp3HVCp06r03jCdaoaYA ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3

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