Hip Hop Universe....!

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Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 561400

Likes : 19471

DisLikes : 904

Published Date : 2018-07-14T16:01:52.000Z

Most Iconic Rap Songs Of The 2010s The most popular rap songs are in most cases considered iconic because of their influence in the genre. Which songs are able to remind you of a year? Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. These phases can be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 71139

Likes : 2312

DisLikes : 202

Published Date : 2018-07-13T17:51:50.000Z

2018 XXL Freshman Cypher Performances RANKED (Worst to Best) Smokepurpp, Lil Pump and BlocBoy JB Cypher is out! Lil Pump, BlocBoy JB and Smokepurpp flex, throw money and come through with the drip in the first 2018 XXL Freshman cypher. YBN Nahmir, Wifisfuneral and Stefflon Don get to work over a Sonny Digital-produced beat in the second 2018 XXL Freshman cypher. Witnessing J.I.D and Ski Mask The Slump God join forces for their cypher was one of the highlights of the 2018 XXL Freshman Class For their 2018 Freshman Class, XXL selected a phalanx of stars for this year's cover, including Lil Pump, Trippie Redd, Smokepurpp, Blocboy JB, YBN Nahmir, WifisFuneral, Ski Mask The Slump God, J.I.D. and Stefflon Don. Unlike past covers, XXL only included nine MCs this year after Lil Skies -- who was voted to be the 10th member through a fan vote -- declined his invite for the cover after initially accepting, the publication reports. The actual issue for the Freshman Class will drop July 3. Then, all nine rappers will hit the stage at Terminal 5 in New York City on July 11 for the annual XXL Freshman Show. Don't fret: XXL will uphold their tradition and continue to show love to the West Coast with an LA show July 19 at The Novo. It's about that time. Despite suffering from an early leak courtesy of DJ Akademiks, the XXL Freshman List moved forward with a dignified sense of secrecy. Now, the time has come for the publication to unveil the lineup, which may still come as a surprise to some. This time around, we're looking at a decent mix of "mumble rappers" and lyricists, and the vibe is undeniably intriguing. So, without further ado, check out the The 2018 Freshman Class below: Ski Mask The Slump God Lil Pump Smokepurpp J.I.D. Stefflon Don Blocboy JB YBN Nahmir Wifisfuneral Trippie Redd The fan-voted tenth spot was awarded to Lil Skies, who ultimately refused to show up. To be honest, it kind of feels like a waste, especially given the omission of one notable rainbow-headed rapper. Either way, Florida clearly had a big showing this year, and it's great to see J.I.D. hold it down for the lyricists. It feels like an improvement over last year's lineup, and the obligatory Cypher should be interesting this time around, given the divided stylistic nature of the class. What do ya'll think of XXL's latest lineup? Did they get it right, or do you feel like they missed the mark? Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 133714

Likes : 4847

DisLikes : 1576

Published Date : 2018-06-29T15:56:48.000Z

Best Rapper Of All Time. Everyone has an opinion who is the G.O.A.T (Greatest Of All Time) and everyone has a list of their favorite MC's. Who's the greatest MC of all time? What does that title really mean? What does it take to become the greatest rapper ever? Times change. Skills fade. New greats emerge; old ones decline. How do you crown one MC the best when there are so many great emcees still working? The following 100 emcees have done everything it takes to make a play for the throne. Finally, a definitive list of the best rappers of all time, ranked by fans all over the world. From the early '80s to present day, this list counts down rap's best lyricists and game changers in history. Lil' Wayne, Method Man, Jay-Z, Eminem, Andre 3000, and T.I are among the artists that appear on this amazing countdown. Rappers from all cities, both genders, and all races are all vying to be crowned the greatest rapper ever. What makes a rapper great? There are a number of differing definitions and philosophies. Rapper J. Cole (who finds himself on the Ultimate List below) cites consistency as the most important attribute, and says it's important to look both for the big humorous "punch" lines as well as the underlying message of the rapper's songs. Nas (another MC featured on the list) focuses as well on the meaning of the songs, as well as the scale and ambition of the rapper's narratives and storytelling. (He has also gone on the record as saying that there is no such thing as the "best rapper" or "Greatest of All Time" - often abbreviated as G.O.A.T.) Numerous different skills and attributes all must come together to make a truly legendary MC. Obviously, a rapper must display a sense of rhythm and an ability to compliment the beat in unpredictable and exciting ways. A gift for lyricism and vocabulary is similarly essential - you can have the flow of the century, but if the words don't come together to tell a compelling story or present a unique point of view, it's still not going to translate into a great hip-hop song. But of course there's also an intangible element that elevates some rappers into the ranks of the greatest of all time. Who are these rappers who stand heads above the competition? You tell us, by voting for your favorites below or making your own list of Top Rappers. So these rappers come into mind when the question "who is the best rapper of all time" comes into mind. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 2414463

Likes : 29084

DisLikes : 2129

Published Date : 2017-07-08T16:00:02.000Z

Best Rap Songs Of All Time And Of Each Year. The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. Best Hip-Hop Songs Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tTlaQsdgT_8 I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the 100 greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 99176

Likes : 2797

DisLikes : 146

Published Date : 2018-04-13T19:44:07.000Z

Best Rap Songs Of All Time. The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. Best Hip-Hop Songs Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BF5aKI6FHgM I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the 100 greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 145057

Likes : 4871

DisLikes : 86

Published Date : 2018-06-08T17:00:35.000Z

Songs That Made Rappers Famous. How did Rappers become famous? Are One Hit Wonders a good aspect of rap music? Is the fame well deserved for one song? Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. The New School can again be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Universe Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxx3Dp3HVCp06r03jCdaoaYA ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 1028588

Likes : 15755

DisLikes : 7710

Published Date : 2018-05-04T18:03:46.000Z

One Hit Wonder Rappers In Hip-Hop. A list of the Greatest Rap Songs by One-Hit Wonders. Are you looking for your favorite rap songs, but don’t know remember who the artist is? Browse through this list of the greatest rap songs by one-hit wonders to see if your favorite song made the list. Then you can see who the rap artist is and search for the album to listen to sometime. Ordered from the most popular one-hit rap song wonders to the least popular, you can find some great music by picking from the top of the list. Go ahead and vote for your favorite rap songs and artists as well, and they will get raised higher on the list. This list of the best rap songs from one-hit wonders includes Sir Mix-a-Lot's "Baby Got Back," House of Pain's "Jump Around," and many more hip hop classic hits. Feel free to copy and paste from the list to make your own list of favorite rap music. That way, you will never forget the artists to your favorite rap songs again! If you don’t see your favorite song or artist listed, go ahead and add it to the list. Then others can vote for it and you can see where it ranks on the list of great rap songs by one-hit wonders. The style of rap music has taken hold of the country. Even music fans that aren’t rap enthusiasts can often find some rap songs that they truly enjoy. From the fond memories of Inner Circle’s “Bad Boys,” the theme song from the Cops show, to the diversity of M&M, there are many types of rap music to choose from. Look through the list to find your own personal favorite style and song from the one-hit rap song wonders. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Universe Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxx3Dp3HVCp06r03jCdaoaYA ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 353622

Likes : 6573

DisLikes : 1189

Published Date : 2018-05-11T16:36:28.000Z

Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop Part 7. Hip-Hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 234320

Likes : 3762

DisLikes : 5126

Published Date : 2018-05-18T16:00:01.000Z

Good Rap Songs By Bad Rappers. One Hit Wonders in Hip-Hop are famous for creating Hit songs that outshine the rest of their catalogue. There are rappers that I consider bad that are able to create hits. Most of these songs have dope beats but wack lyrics. I tried to ignore the lyrical aspect when listening to these songs. This list is NOT my normal taste of music. I would still consider most of these artists trash, because the beats in most cases outshine the artist. So the question is: How wack are song lyrics allowed to be, to considerer it good? As always, your opinion is what matters. There are as always hidden signs in the video. Have fun searching for them. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. These phases can be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Universe Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxx3Dp3HVCp06r03jCdaoaYA ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 203324

Likes : 3705

DisLikes : 3971

Published Date : 2017-12-30T16:00:05.000Z

Worst Hip-Hop Songs 2017. Picking the worst songs of the year is serious business. It’s like I always say: Saying something is the best is a matter of opinion, but declaring something the worst requires evidence. You can’t just go with the songs that you’re sick of hearing or find mildly irritating. You must dig through all the garbage released in a given year and determine what is demonstrably terrible. These songs must clear rooms, ruin days, and cause physical discomfort. And it takes hard work, patience, fortitude, and partial deafness to help withstand the steady onslaught of bad you must endure to find those songs. But I’ve done it! These are the worst songs of 2017, ranked in order from infuriatingly insipid to awful ear-poisoning. 2017 also introduced us to Lil Pump, who recently broke the record for shortest song on the Billboard Top 10 with his single "Gucci Gang." The song went on to peak at No. 3, which is fairly impressive considering its short duration. Shortly before Pump came Ski Mask The Slump God, 2017 XXL Freshman XXXTentacion and Trippie Redd, all of who have become viral hip-hop sensations over the past year for their crafty, unhinged lyrics and visually appealing, somewhat eerie videos. Millions drew to them, and still do; others are not as impressed. For those not riding the new wave, rap front runners JAY-Z and Kendrick Lamar came through in the clutch with their deliveries of 4:44 and DAMN., respectively. The albums provided lyrical heat and production hip-hop fans, old and new, can appreciate for decades on end. Their new albums were given over a handful of nominations for the 2018 Grammy Awards, with JAY-Z's project up for Album of the Year. Then, of course, 2017 is the year Cardi B rose from Love & Hip Hop fame to No. 1 on the Billboard charts for her catchy summer banger "Bodak Yellow." Everyone from Janet Jackson to middle school teachers have pledged their allegiance to Bardi Gang, proving the Bronx rapper is a force to be reckoned with. Hip-hop has been vastly acknowledged this year from all corners of the entertainment industry. Between that and the number of hits released from acts like Migos, DJ Khaled and A$AP Ferg, rap has become the most consumed genre in the U.S. We've Milly Rocked in New York with Playboi Carti, created our own renditions of Future's "Mask Off" instrumental and counted millions with 21 Savage all year long. Behold: Top 100 - The Worst Hip-Hop Songs Of 2017 Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 126517

Likes : 3791

DisLikes : 283

Published Date : 2018-06-01T21:05:04.000Z

Top 100 Diss Tracks Of All Time. Nothing says rap better than a good feud! The Evolution Of Diss Tracks. What's beef? Is it when your mom ain't safe up in the street? Or is it actually the fifth element of hip-hop? Dating all of the way back to when Big Bank Hank of the Sugar Hill Gang borrowed Grandmaster Caz's rhyme book and used his lyrics without credit on "Rapper's Delight," MCs have been feuding on and off wax for years. Hip-hop is a culture built around machismo and bravado, so backing down or losing a battle could be detrimental to an artist's career. One slip-up and you could find yourself with a one-way ticket to obscurity. Certain MCs have built entire careers around beefing with other artists, while others have had their careers d*stroyed with just a couple lines. But what once began as two rappers simply battling over skill has turned into big business, with parody music videos, elaborate stage shows and entire albums dedicated to the coveted battle. The ante is constantly being upped to keep the fans entertained, so lines will be crossed while artists strive to find unique and creative ways to slander their opponents. Mothers, women and children have all been involved, and in the YouTube era, a rapper just might show up to your house with a camera crew looking for a br*wl. The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 1777275

Likes : 24203

DisLikes : 2129

Published Date : 2017-02-20T22:27:12.000Z

The Best Diss Songs Of All Time. Nothing says rap better than a good feud! What's beef? Is it when your mom ain't safe up in the street? Or is it actually the fifth element of hip-hop? Dating all of the way back to when Big Bank Hank of the Sugar Hill Gang borrowed Grandmaster Caz's rhyme book and used his lyrics without credit on "Rapper's Delight," MCs have been feuding on and off wax for years. Hip-hop is a culture built around machismo and bravado, so backing down or losing a battle could be detrimental to an artist's career. One slip-up and you could find yourself with a one-way ticket to obscurity. Certain MCs have built entire careers around beefing with other artists, while others have had their careers d*stroyed with just a couple lines. But what once began as two rappers simply battling over skill has turned into big business, with parody music videos, elaborate stage shows and entire albums dedicated to the coveted battle. The ante is constantly being upped to keep the fans entertained, so lines will be crossed while artists strive to find unique and creative ways to slander their opponents. Mothers, women and children have all been involved, and in the YouTube era, a rapper just might show up to your house with a camera crew looking for a br*wl Drake's Back To Back is the greatest battle record of all time. But let's take a look at the diss songs that were overshadowed by Drakes Meek Mill diss. Let's take a journey to the past and let's take a look at the historic beefs that occurred. What was the biggest beef of all time? Who battled who? Which Diss Songs were relevant? So with beef always in season, Hip-Hop Universe has compiled The 50 Best Hip-Hop Diss Songs for your consumption. Vegetarians beware. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 90552

Likes : 1007

DisLikes : 3055

Published Date : 2016-05-14T19:14:45.000Z

Worst Rappers Of All Time. For every decent, innovative rapper out there, there are several copycat artists that bring nothing to the table. We’ve listed what we feel are the worst of the worst in the genre. We know that best of and worst of lists are subjective. What we feel is the bottom of the barrel, you might think is pretty great. Sales have nothing to do with it either. While researching this list we’ve discovered there are some million-selling artists like Iggy Azalea, Drake and Nikki Minaj that are pretty polarizing among hip hop aficionados. We need your input. Who, to you, is the worst rapper out there? Take a look at the list and let us know, and if there’s someone you think we’ve overlooked be sure and let us know! Who is the worst rapper ever? Let's find out. I know many people will dislike this Video because there are millions of people supporting these artists. People who support this have an approximated IQ of 60 or are deaf. But I still want to present you my opinion (for 2016). Coming to the Ranking, the first 5 on this List are not that bad. They are just Rap-millionaires for no reason and known for no reason. They don't add anything positive to Hip-Hop. They are overall bad lyricists. And as for Number 45, don't count Eminem & Proof as a member of D12. D12 is a "band" of a bunch of wack Mc's. I consider them as one of the most overhyped Rap groups in history. Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDXbHeIGPfQ Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ab3HXMvUK4E Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 2108947

Likes : 32205

DisLikes : 3547

Published Date : 2018-05-25T16:00:04.000Z

The Evolution Of Mumble Rap. Mumble rap - the most recent art form of rapping - or arguably the art of not rapping. Rather than rapping clearly, eloquently, articulately and with prowess and esteem, mumble rappers string occasional words together, like “cat”, “sat” and if you’re lucky, “mat”. And mumble rappers tend to do just that, they mumble. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 94966

Likes : 2650

DisLikes : 321

Published Date : 2017-10-27T16:00:03.000Z

The Best Rap Albums of all time. Hip-hop has produced plenty of great music over its 40-plus history. Some of them are worthy of the title "greatest rap album," some more than others. That's the essence of this list. These albums were picked on the grounds creativity, originality, replay value, lyricism and overall cultural impact. What are the best hip hop albums of all time? The answer, of course, is totally subjective. Everyone has differing opinions about which hip hop and rap albums should be ranked on top, and that's what this list is all about. Vote for your personal favorite hip hop albums ever, and vote down those albums listed that you don't feel are worthy of the honor. The hip-hop albums here represent decades of great music from notables rappers and hip-hop artists -- some we've lost, and others who continue to make great music year after year. Some of the biggest and best hip hop albums ever made include classics like The Chronic from Dr. Dre, Fear of a Black Planet by Public Enemy, Paid in Full by Eric B. and Rakim and N***az4Life by N.W.A. And no list of amazing hip hop albums would be complete without Enter the Wu-Tang: 36 Chambers by Wu-Tang Clan and Life After Death by The Notorious B.I.G. If your favorite hip hop album isn't listed here, by all means, add it. And don't forget to include whatever great 2017 hip hop albums you loved. They might be new, but some are instant classics. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 104375

Likes : 2328

DisLikes : 473

Published Date : 2017-12-23T17:11:12.000Z

Best Hip-Hop Songs 2017. What a year 2017 has been. The Lil's have taken over with a vengeance, and their music has taken them to new heights. Meanwhile, seasoned rap artists have provided classics to bump well into the New Year. Over the last 12 months, hip-hop has witnessed how the genre has transformed from what it once was five years ago. 2017 also introduced us to Lil Pump, who recently broke the record for shortest song on the Billboard Top 10 with his single "Gucci Gang." The song went on to peak at No. 3, which is fairly impressive considering its short duration. Shortly before Pump came Ski Mask The Slump God, 2017 XXL Freshman XXXTentacion and Trippie Redd, all of who have become viral hip-hop sensations over the past year for their crafty, unhinged lyrics and visually appealing, somewhat eerie videos. Millions drew to them, and still do; others are not as impressed. For those not riding the new wave, rap front runners JAY-Z and Kendrick Lamar came through in the clutch with their deliveries of 4:44 and DAMN., respectively. The albums provided lyrical heat and production hip-hop fans, old and new, can appreciate for decades on end. Their new albums were given over a handful of nominations for the 2018 Grammy Awards, with JAY-Z's project up for Album of the Year. Then, of course, 2017 is the year Cardi B rose from Love & Hip Hop fame to No. 1 on the Billboard charts for her catchy summer banger "Bodak Yellow." Everyone from Janet Jackson to middle school teachers have pledged their allegiance to Bardi Gang, proving the Bronx rapper is a force to be reckoned with. Hip-hop has been vastly acknowledged this year from all corners of the entertainment industry. Between that and the number of hits released from acts like Migos, DJ Khaled and A$AP Ferg, rap has become the most consumed genre in the U.S. We've Milly Rocked in New York with Playboi Carti, created our own renditions of Future's "Mask Off" instrumental and counted millions with 21 Savage all year long. Get ready for the ultimate Hip-Hop playlist, filled with massive songs from the likes of EMINEM, JAY-Z, Kendrick Lamar, The Wu-Tang Clan etc. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 292672

Likes : 5304

DisLikes : 2054

Published Date : 2016-07-05T22:40:42.000Z

Best Rappers Of All Time. After seeing the worst rappers of all time, it's time to create a contrast with the best rappers of all time list. Everyone has an opinion who is the G.O.A.T (Greatest Of All Time) and everyone has a list of their favorite MC's. Who's the greatest MC of all time? What does that title really mean? What does it take to become the greatest rapper ever? Times change. Skills fade. New greats emerge; old ones decline. How do you crown one MC the best when there are so many great emcees still working? The following 50 emcees have done everything it takes to make a play for the throne. Finally, a definitive list of the best rappers of all time, ranked by fans all over the world. From the early '80s to present day, this list counts down rap's best lyricists and game changers in history. Lil' Wayne, Method Man, Jay-Z, Eminem, Andre 3000, and T.I are among the artists that appear on this amazing countdown. Rappers from all cities, both genders, and all races are all vying to be crowned the greatest rapper ever. What makes a rapper great? There are a number of differing definitions and philosophies. Rapper J. Cole (who finds himself on the Ultimate List below) cites consistency as the most important attribute, and says it's important to look both for the big humorous "punch" lines as well as the underlying message of the rapper's songs. Nas (another MC featured on the list) focuses as well on the meaning of the songs, as well as the scale and ambition of the rapper's narratives and storytelling. (He has also gone on the record as saying that there is no such thing as the "best rapper" or "Greatest of All Time" - often abbreviated as G.O.A.T.) Numerous different skills and attributes all must come together to make a truly legendary MC. Obviously, a rapper must display a sense of rhythm and an ability to compliment the beat in unpredictable and exciting ways. A gift for lyricism and vocabulary is similarly essential - you can have the flow of the century, but if the words don't come together to tell a compelling story or present a unique point of view, it's still not going to translate into a great hip-hop song. But of course there's also an intangible element that elevates some rappers into the ranks of the greatest of all time. Who are these rappers who stand heads above the competition? You tell us, by voting for your favorites below or making your own list of Top Rappers. So these rappers come into mind when the question "who is the best rapper of all time" comes into mind. MF Doom was accidentally left out. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 880447

Likes : 12568

DisLikes : 1293

Published Date : 2018-03-19T16:45:05.000Z

Mumble Rap Vs Lyrical Rap. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. These phases can be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 2421554

Likes : 36837

DisLikes : 2416

Published Date : 2018-04-03T18:01:16.000Z

Songs That Made Rappers Famous. How did Rappers become famous? Are One Hit Wonders a good aspect of rap music? Is the fame well deserved for one song? Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. These phases can be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Universe Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxx3Dp3HVCp06r03jCdaoaYA ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 4175041

Likes : 64357

DisLikes : 8079

Published Date : 2018-03-17T18:14:57.000Z

Best Hip-Hop Song Each Year. The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 522550

Likes : 10311

DisLikes : 346

Published Date : 2017-05-14T19:40:29.000Z

East Coast Hip-Hop Vs. West Coast Hip-Hop. We are comparing both styles without restarting the East Coast West Coast beef The East Coast–West Coast hip hop rivalry was a feud from 1991 to 1997 between artists and fans of the East Coast hip hop and West Coast hip hop scenes in the United States, especially from 1994 to 1997. Focal points of the feud were East Coast-based rapper The Notorious B.I.G. (and his New York-based label, Bad Boy Records) and West Coast-based rapper Tupac Shakur (and his Los Angeles-based label, Death Row Records), who became symbols of the East Coast/West Coast feud. As it was originally known, hip hop was a movement in New York City in the late 1970s and early 1980s. It revolved around four key areas: MCing (now known as rapping), DJing, graffiti art and b-boying (breakdancing). While all four areas were important, the two that we will focus on are MCing and DJing, as they have the most relevance to both to audio and hip hop. Hip hop’s roots come from a DJ scratching a record to create a looped beat while an MC raps along to the beat. While much has changed over the years, the essential idea of rapping to a looped beat is still the foundation for most hip hop songs. Many music producers still follow these old techniques, loading up an old soul record and creating a new track. However, hip hop advanced beyond this in 1983 when Afrika Bambaataa and the Soulsonic Force began using synthesizers and drum machines to create entirely new tracks. While there is much that took place along with this, and many artists such as Run-DMC, LL Cool J and others helped to define the genre, let’s fast-forward to 1987. In 1987, in Compton, CA, an important move was taking place. Where previously hip hop had been politically and socially motivated, a new sub-genre was forming: gangsta rap. A group known as N.W.A., consisting of Dr. Dre, MC Ren, Ice Cube and Eazy-E released an album titled “Straight Outta Compton.” Dr. Dre provided the production for the album, consisting almost entirely of rolling basslines and drums. Straight Outta Compton was a smashing hit. While the group eventually disbanded over financial disputes, N.W.A.’s legacy would help shape the future. Dr. Dre would later sign with Suge Knight’s Death Row Records, along with an up-and coming rapper named Tupac Shakur, ushering in the era of West Coast Gangsta Rap. Dre remains quite influential in the industry today, widely recognized as a pioneer in hip hop and music production. Meanwhile, back on the East Coast, a similar movement was happening. Perhaps most notable was Sean “Puffy” Combs’ departure from Uptown Records, taking newly signed rapper The Notorious B.I.G. (Biggie) with him to found Bad Boy Records. Bad Boy Records was competing with Suge Knight’s West Coast powerhouse D*ath Row Records. This, while not immediately, would lead to the downfall of gangsta rap as a genre, and move hip hop into the popular music genre where it remains today. Let’s end the history lesson here. There is much more that could be said, with artists along the way that I have overlooked, but this is just meant to be a brief outline to provide context. Additionally, the closer we move to our present time, the harder it becomes to analyze the music from a historical standpoint. Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 3745399

Likes : 63554

DisLikes : 2785

Published Date : 2018-03-16T20:23:50.000Z

Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop 6. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 111631

Likes : 3823

DisLikes : 618

Published Date : 2018-03-27T18:18:53.000Z

Best Rappers Of The New School. Hip hop heads, who are the best new school rappers? Mainstream rap keeps changing over the years with gangsta rap becoming more underground, while trap music quickly rose in popularity. Regardless of rap's evolution, the best current rappers still have powerful lyrics, catchy hooks, and good beats. Which rapper is currently at the top of the hip hop game? People often complain about the lack of lyricists in Hip Hop’s new generation. While the lyrically proficient MCs might not be getting the major looks like their melodic counterparts, they’re still out there and dropping excellent music worthy of recognition. With back-to-school season in full effect, Hip-Hop Universe has donned the teacher’s cap and put together a lesson plan on some of the new school’s finest rappers. While this isn’t the definitive lineup of the best rappers of this generation, it should give readers an idea of who’s out there. Plenty of rappers deserve some shine, so think of this as the opening chapter of the Hip Hop fan’s textbook on the new class. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 332699

Likes : 2873

DisLikes : 193

Published Date : 2018-05-30T17:35:24.000Z

Pusha T Destroys Drake With "The Story Of Adidon" “The Story of Adidon” is Pusha-T’s response to Drake’s diss track “Duppy Freestyle.” On his new Daytona album, Pusha-T seems to take aim at Drake and his alleged use of ghostwriters. “Your hooks did it/The lyrics pennin' equals to Trump's winnin'/The bigger question is how the Russians did it/It was written like Nas but it came from Quentin,” Pusha raps on “Infrared.” Now, Drake has responded with a new song. Entitled “Duppy Freestyle,” the track features Drake firing shots at Pusha-T and Kanye West. Drake starts out “Duppy Freestyle” by calling out Pusha-T and Kanye. “If you rebuke me for working with someone else on a couple of V’s, what do you really think of the n*gga that’s making your beats?/I’ve done things for him, I thought that he never would need/Father had to stretch his hands out and get it for me,” he raps. Daytona was entirely produced by Kanye. Later on, Drake calls out Kanye by name: “Tell ’Ye we got an invoice comin’ to you/Considering we just sold another 20 for you.” Elsewhere in the freestyle, he comments on their G.O.O.D. Music label (“You’re not even top 5, as far as your label talent goes”) and takes personal hits against Pusha (“You might've sold some college kids some Nikes and Mercedes/But you act like you sold dr*gs for Escobar in the ’80s”). He also criticizes the two for allegedly not supporting Virgil Abloh (“I could never have a Virgil in my circle and hold him back, ‘cause he makes me nervous/...You n*ggas leeches and serpents”). Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Beefs Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzMdBF-NQwbs-GyZf8x2OIX ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 287333

Likes : 6238

DisLikes : 2040

Published Date : 2018-03-21T18:40:32.000Z

Overrated Rappers Vs. Underrated Rappers. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. These phases can be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 368167

Likes : 6455

DisLikes : 6382

Published Date : 2017-07-01T13:17:10.000Z

The Worst Rappers Of All Time [50 Wack Rappers]. For every decent, innovative rapper out there, there are several copycat artists that bring nothing to the table. We’ve listed what we feel are the worst of the worst in the genre. We know that best of and worst of lists are subjective. What we feel is the bottom of the barrel, you might think is pretty great. Sales have nothing to do with it either. While researching this list we’ve discovered there are some million-selling artists like Iggy Azalea, Drake and Nikki Minaj that are pretty polarizing among hip hop aficionados. We need your input. Who, to you, is the worst rapper out there? Take a look at the list and let us know, and if there’s someone you think we’ve overlooked be sure and let us know! Who is the worst rapper ever? Let's find out. I know many people will dislike this Video because there are millions of people supporting these artists. But I still want to present you my opinion (for 2017). This is a part 3 to my original worst rappers of all time video. Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVKnbtnd0As Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDXbHeIGPfQ This is a part 3 to my original worst rappers of all time video. The 10 first rappers are in the 2017 XXL Freshman Class, those are Kamaiyah, A Boogie Wit Da Hoodie, PnB Rock, Madeintyo, Playboi Carti, Aminé, Kap G, Kyle, Ugly God and 10th Spot winner XXXTentacion. Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 80383

Likes : 2274

DisLikes : 354

Published Date : 2018-03-18T18:40:53.000Z

Rappers That Are Not Wack, Rappers Who I Remove From My Worst Rappers List These are 20 Rappers that I remove from my "Worst Rappers Of All Time" list. For every decent, innovative rapper out there, there are several copycat artists that bring nothing to the table. We’ve listed what we feel are the worst of the worst in the genre. We know that best of and worst of lists are subjective. What we feel is the bottom of the barrel, you might think is pretty great. Sales have nothing to do with it either. While researching this list we’ve discovered there are some million-selling artists like Iggy Azalea, Drake and Nikki Minaj that are pretty polarizing among hip hop aficionados. This is an update for the "Worst Rappers Of All Time" Series: Part 1: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sVKnbtnd0As Part 2: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xDXbHeIGPfQ Part 3: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ab3HXMvUK4E Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 94292

Likes : 2524

DisLikes : 54

Published Date : 2018-03-31T17:14:48.000Z

Best Rap Beefs & Feuds Of all Time. Nothing says rap better than a good feud! Diss Tracks & Beefs... What's beef? Is it when your mom ain't safe up in the street? Or is it actually the fifth element of hip-hop? Dating all of the way back to when Big Bank Hank of the Sugar Hill Gang borrowed Grandmaster Caz's rhyme book and used his lyrics without credit on "Rapper's Delight," MCs have been feuding on and off wax for years. Hip-hop is a culture built around machismo and bravado, so backing down or losing a battle could be detrimental to an artist's career. One slip-up and you could find yourself with a one-way ticket to obscurity. Certain MCs have built entire careers around beefing with other artists, while others have had their careers d*stroyed with just a couple lines. But what once began as two rappers simply battling over skill has turned into big business, with parody music videos, elaborate stage shows and entire albums dedicated to the coveted battle. The ante is constantly being upped to keep the fans entertained, so lines will be crossed while artists strive to find unique and creative ways to slander their opponents. Mothers, women and children have all been involved, and in the YouTube era, a rapper just might show up to your house with a camera crew looking for a br*wl. The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 1779099

Likes : 26797

DisLikes : 1010

Published Date : 2018-03-24T15:00:01.000Z

Evolution Of Diss Songs & The Best Diss Song Every Year Nothing says rap better than a good feud! What's beef? Is it when your mom ain't safe up in the street? Or is it actually the fifth element of hip-hop? Dating all of the way back to when Big Bank Hank of the Sugar Hill Gang borrowed Grandmaster Caz's rhyme book and used his lyrics without credit on "Rapper's Delight," MCs have been feuding on and off wax for years. Hip-hop is a culture built around machismo and bravado, so backing down or losing a battle could be detrimental to an artist's career. One slip-up and you could find yourself with a one-way ticket to obscurity. Certain MCs have built entire careers around beefing with other artists, while others have had their careers d*stroyed with just a couple lines. But what once began as two rappers simply battling over skill has turned into big business, with parody music videos, elaborate stage shows and entire albums dedicated to the coveted battle. The ante is constantly being upped to keep the fans entertained, so lines will be crossed while artists strive to find unique and creative ways to slander their opponents. Mothers, women and children have all been involved, and in the YouTube era, a rapper just might show up to your house with a camera crew looking for a br*wl. The best hip-hop songs of all time are those songs that touch our soul. They make us smile, laugh, cry, think, move and shake what our mama (or papa) gave us. I traveled back four decades and dug through a pile of tunes to compile a list of the greatest songs hip-hop has ever witnessed. Picking hip-hop's greatest songs is an incredibly difficult (and incredibly fun) undertaking, considering the various styles that have splintered the genre every way imaginable. Now 40 years old, hip-hop no more belongs to Bronx originators than it does to today's kids; its popularity has stretched to all corners, and the various mutations reflect that. Our picks reflect the songs that innovated, enlightened, delighted, and lasted. These are hip-hop tracks that, with any justice, our grandchildren will have on playlists that are implanted into their brains, or whatever. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 511384

Likes : 10969

DisLikes : 861

Published Date : 2018-04-28T12:00:09.000Z

Evolution Of Gangsta Rap. Gangsta rap or Gangster rap is a style of hip hop characterized by themes and lyrics that generally emphasize the "gangsta" lifestyle. The genre evolved from hardcore rap into a distinct form, pioneered in the mid-1980s by rappers such as Schoolly D and Ice-T, and was popularized in the later part of the 1980s by groups like N.W.A. After the national attention that Ice-T and N.W.A attracted in the late 1980s and early 1990s, gangsta rap became the most commercially lucrative subgenre of hip hop. Many (if not most) gangsta rap artists openly boast of their associations with various active street gangs as part of their artistic image, with the Bloods and Crips being the most commonly represented. Gangsta rap parallels other indigenous gang and crime-oriented forms of music, such as the narcocorrido genre of northern Mexico. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : KRD 1999

Views : 552

Likes : 20

DisLikes : 6

Published Date : 2017-08-31T15:29:28.000Z

    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 218766

Likes : 2631

DisLikes : 170

Published Date : 2017-04-22T10:02:54.000Z

2Pac Says He Would Destroy Rakim, KRS-One, LL Cool J, Nas, Biggie and Ice Cube. 2Pac Speaks About KRS-One, LL Cool J & Rakim, Slick Rick, Melle Mel & other rappers that he is a fan of. He continues by saying that Ice Cube is doing wrong and he won't bow down to him. 2Pac also touches on his conflict with Nas, Mobb Deep and The Notorious B.I.G. 2Pac was ready to take on everyone who is involved with Biggie. "Only a fan of me, can out diss me. I have been fans of KRS-One, LL Cool J, Rakim, I've mastered their styles, so if they've come out dissing, I could destroy them!" They know that I was the truest n*gga involved with Biggies success. I was the biggest help, I was true. I would write his rhymes and you know how much he borrowed from me. He knows how I used to stop my shows and let him touch the show. It would bl*w up in the middle of my whole show. I used to buy him sh*t and give him sh*t and never ask for it back. I used to share. I'd share my experience in the game and the lessons and my roles and my knowledge of the game with him. Ya know what I mean? He owe me more. He owed me more than to turn his head and act like he didn't know some n*ggaz were bout to try and bl*w my f*ckin' head off. He knew! That's what I'm talking about. And then he f*ckin' disappeared, like a mouse. If your gonna be a mouse that's cool be a mouse but for me to know that 3 weeks ago this happened and then 3 weeks later your albums comin' out and your talkin'about how your a f*ckin' "Don" in your album. But you don't know who sh*t me?! ! In your f*ckin' hometown, these niggaz from your neighborhood! And I gotta find out for myself! I don't even call myself a "Don" I'm just a "Cappo." From the Westside, and here I am on the Eastside in jail and I know who touched me and I know everything t hat happened. Thats power! And he even knows that he was fakin' it. And I was mad about that. And then I'm outta jail, and I couldn't believe that everyone was treatin' Biggie like the biggest f*ckin' star in the world. I couldn't believe that the people were buying into his player image and I just wanted to bring it back to reality. It's like can't nobody never get confused and think I'm like a Mike Tyson and I'm a heavy-weight champion. I'm a little n*gga. And thats why its so raw to just watch me battle the lions cuz I'm just a little skinny n*gga, battlin' n*ggaz three times my size. Well Biggies not a playa, he's never been. He never had b*tches til he got some f*ckin' money. That's a trick that's not a player. That's not a poppa. So my point was to pr ove them wrong. I took every thing they glamourized and I personified it. Everything he want to have, I got. Jewels, look, I got more jewels than slick rick. Slick Rick, I love that n*gga til f*ckin' d*ath but I'm definatly doin' it. I personify every image that a n*ggaz faced. I personified it. Because I looked up to these n*ggaz. So everything they talkin' about I really got into it and I perfected it. So I know if he's pretendin' and I know it. So now all he can do is act like he don't know what the f*ck is going on. Think! People have to Think! If this were happening for real would this be your reaction, unless you was guilty. I don't have no mercy in w*r. They didn't have no mercy, they tried to sh**t my f*ckin' balls off! What about my kids? And they say, why you talkin' about them kids with the sickle cell? They tried to make me a parapalegic!! What the f*ck is going on here? Why is that sacred? Ain't nothing sacred in war. I was in Rikers givin these n*ggaz love. Mobb Deep. The guard knew em' I told em' tell them n*gga I love them how shorty's dope, them niggaz was down man. When they did that they proved that they was little, just little n*ggaz that wanna be heard. I used to be a little n*gga I know where they at. I know they can't touch me thats why I destroyed em' so fast. Soon nobodys gonna believe this shit. I told these niggaz in the begining that I was gonna take them out this rap game and sure enough I will. Already people cant look at Biggie and not laugh. I took every bit of their power. All I wanted to do was to take them to where I was. When they didn't want to support me. And anybody that tried to help them... I will destroy. And thats what I'm doin' everyone that tried to side with them, or tried to unify with them, I'm gonna destroy. I swear TO GOD!! Can't nobody touch me right now. And next month all of this will be over, but this month, I'm taking every moving target out. Because this is a very personal thing for me and I feel like people should have gave me my respect. Ya'll know I was not like this before. Hip-Hop Universe Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxx3Dp3HVCp06r03jCdaoaYA ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 1051431

Likes : 19092

DisLikes : 1721

Published Date : 2017-02-23T11:04:06.000Z

Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : TheHipHopClub

Views : 1722

Likes : 66

DisLikes : 0

Published Date : 2018-05-06T01:28:18.000Z

Hip Hop Universe: https://bit.ly/2HXSoIu Original song: 700 Bars - Eko Fresh [prod. by Phat Crispy] Edited by The Hip Hop Club.
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 163613

Likes : 6818

DisLikes : 88

Published Date : 2018-04-06T15:52:48.000Z

If You Rap You Lose Challange / Try Not To Rap. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. These phases can be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lesser known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Universe Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxx3Dp3HVCp06r03jCdaoaYA ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 43213

Likes : 434

DisLikes : 60

Published Date : 2016-11-09T16:54:26.000Z

Rappers Talk About Donald Trump. What do rappers and members of the Hip-Hop community think about the new President Donald Trump? Who would be more suitable for the presidency Trump, EMINEM, 2Pac. Everyone has their own thought about politics and many people were surprised about Hillary Clintons loss against Donald Trump. Unsympathetic or funny, everyone has a different opinion about the new president of the United States. What do you think? Trump’s election was the surprising culmination of an unpredictable and unprecedented campaign Donald Trump, the billionaire businessman turned reality TV star who repeatedly defied political norms and conventional wisdom on his way to a hostile takeover of the Republican Party before mounting a combative and acidic general election campaign, was elected the 45th President of the United States on Tuesday, defeating Hillary Clinton to cap a historic rise to highest office in the land. Trump’s election was the surprising culmination of a campaign that was unpredictable and unprecedented from its start. Polls across a wide range of battleground states showed Clinton holding a narrow but consistent lead in the days before the election. But a race that political watchers in both parties had expected to go the Democrat’s way quickly became a nail-biter, with razor-thin margins in key states turning into a Trump tide that flooded the electoral map. The GOP nominee won Ohio, Florida, and North Carolina, cutting off several paths for Clinton to win an Electoral College victory. Trump was then declared the victor in Pennsylvania, and the Associated Press called the race for him at 2:30 a.m. Clinton called Trump to concede, a Trump aide confirmed, shortly after her campaign chairman signaled she would not address the results until later. “Hillary has worked very long and very hard over a long period of time, and we owe her a major debt of gratitude for her service to our country,” Trump said. “I pledge to every citizen of our land that I will be president for all Americans and this is so important to me.” At every turn, Trump’s unlikely candidacy represented a departure from political precedent, as a billionaire real estate mogul who had never held elected office became a major party nominee who vowed to take on the political establishment. The first woman to receive a major party’s presidential nomination, Clinton, 69, would have become the country’s first female president. Trump’s unconventional candidacy was characterized by dark warnings about the future of the country and isolationist promises to be strong on national security, during a presidential race that turned into a referendum on America’s fundamental identity and principles. But early Wednesday morning, he pledged to work with the world at large. “I want to tell the world community that while we will always put america’s interests first, we will deal fairly with everyone — all people and all other nations,” he said. “We will seek common ground, not hostility. Partnership, not conflict” "She congratulated us," Trump said, "and I congratulated her and her family on a very, very hard-fought campaign." "We owe her a major debt of gratitude for her service to our country," he added. The former secretary of state, like many in her party, entered election day confident in a victory that would have ensured Democrats retained the White House for a third consecutive term. But Trump, the real estate magnate turned reality television star, demonstrated unexpected strength in Rust Belt states that had been the foundation of President Obama's two victories. The White House did not comment on whether Obama would also call Trump. Hip-Hop Universe Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxwFamWwOriPMkF21e4Up1J_ ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 3786862

Likes : 86520

DisLikes : 4013

Published Date : 2017-07-15T16:00:03.000Z

Evolution Of Rap, Best Rap Song Of Each Year. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 129143

Likes : 2763

DisLikes : 115

Published Date : 2017-09-02T16:00:04.000Z

East Coast Hip-Hop Vs. West Coast Hip-Hop 2. We are comparing both styles without restarting the East Coast West Coast beef The East Coast–West Coast hip hop rivalry was a feud from 1991 to 1997 between artists and fans of the East Coast hip hop and West Coast hip hop scenes in the United States, especially from 1994 to 1997. Focal points of the feud were East Coast-based rapper The Notorious B.I.G. (and his New York-based label, Bad Boy Records) and West Coast-based rapper Tupac Shakur (and his Los Angeles-based label, Death Row Records), who became symbols of the East Coast/West Coast feud. As it was originally known, hip hop was a movement in New York City in the late 1970s and early 1980s. It revolved around four key areas: MCing (now known as rapping), DJing, graffiti art and b-boying (breakdancing). While all four areas were important, the two that we will focus on are MCing and DJing, as they have the most relevance to both to audio and hip hop. Hip hop’s roots come from a DJ scratching a record to create a looped beat while an MC raps along to the beat. While much has changed over the years, the essential idea of rapping to a looped beat is still the foundation for most hip hop songs. Many music producers still follow these old techniques, loading up an old soul record and creating a new track. However, hip hop advanced beyond this in 1983 when Afrika Bambaataa and the Soulsonic Force began using synthesizers and drum machines to create entirely new tracks. While there is much that took place along with this, and many artists such as Run-DMC, LL Cool J and others helped to define the genre, let’s fast-forward to 1987. In 1987, in Compton, CA, an important move was taking place. Where previously hip hop had been politically and socially motivated, a new sub-genre was forming: gangsta rap. A group known as N.W.A., consisting of Dr. Dre, MC Ren, Ice Cube and Eazy-E released an album titled “Straight Outta Compton.” Dr. Dre provided the production for the album, consisting almost entirely of rolling basslines and drums. Straight Outta Compton was a smashing hit. While the group eventually disbanded over financial disputes, N.W.A.’s legacy would help shape the future. Dr. Dre would later sign with Suge Knight’s Death Row Records, along with an up-and coming rapper named Tupac Shakur, ushering in the era of West Coast Gangsta Rap. Dre remains quite influential in the industry today, widely recognized as a pioneer in hip hop and music production. Meanwhile, back on the East Coast, a similar movement was happening. Perhaps most notable was Sean “Puffy” Combs’ departure from Uptown Records, taking newly signed rapper The Notorious B.I.G. (Biggie) with him to found Bad Boy Records. Bad Boy Records was competing with Suge Knight’s West Coast powerhouse D*ath Row Records. This, while not immediately, would lead to the downfall of gangsta rap as a genre, and move hip hop into the popular music genre where it remains today. Let’s end the history lesson here. There is much more that could be said, with artists along the way that I have overlooked, but this is just meant to be a brief outline to provide context. Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 323216

Likes : 6893

DisLikes : 322

Published Date : 2017-08-19T16:00:05.000Z

Evolution Of Rap, Best Rap Song Of Each Year. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? This Timeline shows how Hip-Hop has changed from 1979 up to 2017. Which Hip-Hop era do you prefer? Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 212056

Likes : 5052

DisLikes : 1103

Published Date : 2018-03-20T18:31:35.000Z

Best Rapper Each Year, The Best Rappers Of All Time. Rap fans tend to get into arguments with other rap fans, and it doesn't take much more than someone declaring their Favorite Rapper. Your favorite rapper is a personal preference, one that requires the most subjective defenses. If you’re rooting for the rookie of the year or a washed-up veteran experiencing a career resurgence or someone no one has heard of as your favorite, then so be it. The choice is yours. The favorite rapper discussion is cool and all, but the coveted distinction in hip-hop is still being named the GOAT (Greatest of All Time). Rookies and new jacks need not apply—this debate is strictly for the catalog artists, people who have shifted the culture in previously unmovable ways, artists whose music has permeated and resonated over an extended period of time. It’s rap’s imaginary Hall of Fame, existing only within the abstract conversations we have about it. But there is one debate that every rap fan not only loves to have but ought to have. A debate that considers both the short-term and long-term implications of an artist’s impact. A debate that pits a rapper in their prime against any and all competitors. A debate that gawks at the cultural landscape and plucks out the one who stands alone: the debate about who is the Best Rapper Alive. Being the BRA is sort of like being the MVP—even though rap doesn’t follow a rigid cultural calendar quite like major sports seasons—because it only requires looking at the current crop of active artists and picking a winner. You can confidently declare the Best Rapper Alive in any given year without having to consider previous decades, the same way you can say LeBron is an MVP even though you’ve never seen Jerry West play. Anyone can become the Best Rapper Alive. Some came out the gate with next-level rhymes that had everyone running back to the lab; for others it was a culmination of their gifts that coalesced for one great year. Much like rap itself, it’s an evolving process. But one thing we know for sure, it’s more about a general feeling among fans rather than any discernible facts. (What facts? It’s all just opinion anyway.) When a rapper steps in front of a microphone, and everyone in hip-hop has no choice but to look their way and give props, well then, they just might be the Best Rapper Alive. It’s still important to consider that the Best Rapper Alive debate is different from the GOAT conversation. Being the BRA doesn’t mean you’re the biggest or the most successful; it just means you're the Best at one particular moment. Of course in hip-hop, being the best is intrinsically about being BIG. And being at your best doesn’t make you the best, so if your prime coincides with someone else’s, well, hey, there’s always next year. You can look back on the hip-hop terrain with 20/20 hindsight, tally up the votes, and declare the GOATs, but the Best Rapper Alive from year to year is a feeling in the moment. There have been debates among rap fans living in that moment since the early days of hip-hop, but those discussions have never been properly cataloged—until now! (Yeah, we're excited. Sue us.) So the question remains: Who got the props? Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 101514

Likes : 3009

DisLikes : 129

Published Date : 2017-03-29T09:48:03.000Z

The Best EMINEM Songs of all time. Marshall Bruce Mathers III (born October 17, 1972), known professionally as Eminem (often stylized as EMINƎM), is an American rapper, songwriter, record producer, and actor. Eminem is the best-selling artist of the 2000s in the United States. Throughout his career, he has had 10 number-one albums on the Billboard 200 and five number-one singles on the Billboard Hot 100. With US sales of 47.4 million albums and 42 million tracks as of June 2014, Eminem is the second best-selling male artist of the Nielsen SoundScan era, the sixth best-selling artist in the United States and the best-selling hip-hop artist. Globally, he has sold more than 245 million albums, making him one of the world's best-selling artists. Additionally, he is is the only artist to have eight albums consecutively debut at No. 1 on the Billboard 200. Rolling Stone ranked him 83rd on its list of 100 Greatest Artists of All Time, calling him the King of Hip Hop. After his debut album Infinite (1996) and then Slim Shady EP (1997), Eminem signed with Dr. Dre's Aftermath Entertainment and subsequently achieved mainstream popularity in 1999 with The Slim Shady LP, which earned him his first Grammy Award for Best Rap Album. His next two releases, 2000's The Marshall Mathers LP and 2002's The Eminem Show, were worldwide successes, with each being certified diamond in U.S. sales, and both winning Best Rap Album Grammy Awards—making Eminem the first artist to win the award for three consecutive LPs. They were followed by Encore in 2004, another critical and commercial success. Eminem went on hiatus after touring in 2005, releasing Relapse in 2009 and Recovery in 2010. Both won Grammy Awards and Recovery was the best-selling album of 2010 worldwide, the second time he had the international best-selling album of the year (after The Eminem Show). Eminem's eighth album, 2013's The Marshall Mathers LP 2, won two Grammy Awards, including Best Rap Album; it expanded his record for the most wins in that category and his Grammy total to 15. In 2017, he released his ninth studio album, Revival. In addition to his solo career, Eminem is an original member of the Midwest hip hop groups Soul Intent and D12. He is also known for his collaborations with fellow Detroit-based rapper Royce da 5'9"; the two are collectively known as Bad Meets Evil. Eminem has developed other ventures, including Shady Records, with manager Paul Rosenberg, which helped launch the careers of artists such as 50 Cent. Eminem has also established his own channel, Shade 45, on Sirius XM Radio. In November 2002, he starred in the hip hop film 8 Mile, which won the Academy Award for Best Original Song, for "Lose Yourself", becoming the first rap artist to ever win the award. Eminem has made cameo appearances in the films The Wash (2001), Funny People (2009), The Interview (2014) and the television series Entourage (2010). Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 682099

Likes : 12560

DisLikes : 1477

Published Date : 2018-06-28T16:52:17.000Z

2018 XXL Freshman Freestyle Ranked Worst To Best (Cypher). For their 2018 Freshman Class, XXL selected a phalanx of stars for this year's cover, including Lil Pump, Trippie Redd, Smokepurpp, Blocboy JB, YBN Nahmir, WifisFuneral, Ski Mask The Slump God, J.I.D. and Stefflon Don. Unlike past covers, XXL only included nine MCs this year after Lil Skies -- who was voted to be the 10th member through a fan vote -- declined his invite for the cover after initially accepting, the publication reports. The actual issue for the Freshman Class will drop July 3. Then, all nine rappers will hit the stage at Terminal 5 in New York City on July 11 for the annual XXL Freshman Show. Don't fret: XXL will uphold their tradition and continue to show love to the West Coast with an LA show July 19 at The Novo. It's about that time. Despite suffering from an early leak courtesy of DJ Akademiks, the XXL Freshman List moved forward with a dignified sense of secrecy. Now, the time has come for the publication to unveil the lineup, which may still come as a surprise to some. This time around, we're looking at a decent mix of "mumble rappers" and lyricists, and the vibe is undeniably intriguing. So, without further ado, check out the The 2018 Freshman Class below: Ski Mask The Slump God Lil Pump Smokepurpp J.I.D. Stefflon Don Blocboy JB YBN Nahmir Wifisfuneral Trippie Redd The fan-voted tenth spot was awarded to Lil Skies, who ultimately refused to show up. To be honest, it kind of feels like a waste, especially given the omission of one notable rainbow-headed rapper. Either way, Florida clearly had a big showing this year, and it's great to see J.I.D. hold it down for the lyricists. It feels like an improvement over last year's lineup, and the obligatory Cypher should be interesting this time around, given the divided stylistic nature of the class. What do ya'll think of XXL's latest lineup? Did they get it right, or do you feel like they missed the mark? Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Countdowns Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxy6F0guJapZy-v9FNzumVT0 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 569848

Likes : 8095

DisLikes : 504

Published Date : 2018-04-21T10:59:37.000Z

J. Cole Disses Lil Pump On 1985 And Takes Aim At Mumble Rap. J. Cole released his highly anticipated fifth studio album KOD on Friday (April 20), and fans online are already singling out the LP’s closing track — “1985 (Intro to ‘The Fall Off’)” — for its subliminals While the song serves as a lecture of sorts for today’s new generation of so-called “mumble rappers,” many fans and commentators believe Cole is calling out one artist in particular: Lil Pump, though he doesn’t mention anyone explicitly. “I heard one of em diss me, I’m surprised/ I ain’t trippin, listen good to my reply/ Come here lil man, let me talk with ya/ See if I can paint for you the larger picture,” Cole raps, before breaking down his intended target. Back in April of 2017, Lil Pump teased a song titled “F*ck J. Cole” via social media. The cut — produced by fellow Florida rapper Smokepurpp — features a whole bunch of “b*tch-ass” and “ugly-*ss” insults toward the Dreamville Records bossman, though Purpp later explained they were just trolling. While Cole reportedly asked fans and attendees to try and keep details from the listening session a secret, many have been sharing what they experienced during the event at Gramercy Theatre on social media, giving us a heads up on what to expect. There's no confirmation on the project's tracklist, but based on people's tweets and posts, we may be in store for a top notch Cole album featuring experimental flows and sounds. KOD follows in the footsteps of Cole's last LP, 4 Your Eyez Only, which he dropped back in 2016. Check out everything you need to know from J. Cole's KOD album listening session below. Fans Formed a Packed Line Outside of Gramercy Theatre Jermaine Lamarr Cole (born January 28, 1985), better known by his stage name J. Cole, is an American hip hop recording artist and record producer. Raised in Fayetteville, North Carolina, Cole initially gained recognition as a rapper following the release of his debut mixtape, The Come Up, in early-2007. Intent on further pursuing a solo career as a rapper, he went on to release two additional mixtapes after signing to Jay-Z's Roc Nation imprint in 2009. Cole released his debut studio album, Cole World: The Sideline Story, in 2011. It debuted at #1 on the U.S. Billboard 200, and was soon certified platinum by the Recording Industry Association of America (RIAA). His next two releases, 2013's Born Sinner and 2014's 2014 Forest Hills Drive, received mostly positive reviews from critics, while being both certified platinum in the United States. 2014's Forest Hills Drive also went platinum with no featuring artists. The latter earned him his first Grammy Award nomination for Best Rap Album. In December 2016, Cole released his fourth studio album 4 Your Eyez Only. The album debuted at #1 on the Billboard 200 chart and was certified platinum in April 2017. Self-taught on piano, Cole also acts as a producer alongside his hip-hop career, producing singles for artists such as Kendrick Lamar and Janet Jackson, as well as handling the majority of the production in his own projects. He has also developed other ventures, including Dreamville Records, as well as a non-profit organization called the Dreamville Foundation. In January 2015, Cole decided to house single mothers rent-free at his childhood home in Fayetteville, North Carolina. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Hip-Hop Beefs Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzMdBF-NQwbs-GyZf8x2OIX ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 124509

Likes : 2656

DisLikes : 241

Published Date : 2017-08-12T16:00:05.000Z

Old School Hip-Hop Vs. New School Hip-Hop Part 5. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Some people think old school Hip-Hop is better than new school Hip-Hop. And there are many people who prefer underground Hip-Hop to mainstream Hip-Hop. What do you think? Old Vs. New I East Vs. West Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxw9GCEtN6Yt056jxhuDPep6 ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3
    

Channel Title : Hip-Hop Universe

Views : 2059796

Likes : 36593

DisLikes : 2043

Published Date : 2018-03-22T20:02:24.000Z

Most Poplular Rap Songs Of The Last Decade. Hip-hop has arguably been the best genre of music in the past two decades. As hip-hop maintains its title, a lot has changed about the genre, such as the lyrics. Hip-hop has two phases, old school and new school each of which give off a different vibe. These phases can be divided into Mumble Rap and Lyrical Rap. Old School “Hip-Hop” has music based prevalently on African American culture. Artists such as Tupac, Biggie Smalls, and Eazy-E often rap about the struggles of growing up in a racialized environment and the work they put in to get where they are today. In popular songs such as “Changes” by Tupac and “Juicy” by Biggie Smalls, the artists explain how they went from “negative to positive” as Biggie put it. Old school hip-hop is still popular today and is regarded as “classic” by many hip-hop fans. “New school” hip-hop has different types of lyrics. Rappers from today’s generation sing typically about girls, money, and cars they have. Some even sing about how they do drgs, drink alchl, and party which sets a bad example for some listeners. Some of these rappers today did not have it as hard as rappers back in the old days. Also Hip-hop artists now are racially diverse, so African American culture is not necessarily found in music today. People who grew up listening to Tupac, Biggie, Eazy-E, and so on typically do not enjoy hip-hop in today’s era. Songs written when rap was introduced were lyrically better because rappers were able to tell a story using words that rhyme and flow. Some songs are also more appealing to fans because they can relate to the struggles their favorite rappers faced. People of this generation are used to listening to new school hip-hop which is the most played genre on the radio. These same fans reject old school Hip-Hop as a part of the music genre. There are even rappers who know nothing about the most influential Hip-Hop artists. Growing up listening to Eminem has caused me to fall in love with him as an artist. He introduced me to Hip-Hop. But I noticed a change in the music industry. Artists wanted to be part of the mainstream industry and they had to change their music to fit into the mainstream category. Because of new artists in hip-hop, many lessen known artists are rarely noticed. These artists are said to be “underground.” Underground rappers usually do not make it big because they have music related to the messages embodied by old school hip-hop artists would say. Outro produced by Phat Crispy: https://www.youtube.com/user/phatcrispy1 Evolution Of Hip-Hop Playlist: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLNxrdTjgEbxzrIGdm8QvkAYa0fHrVCkSw ___________________________ Support us on Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/hiphopuniverse Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hiphopuniverseyoutube/ Twitter: https://twitter.com/hiphopuniverse3

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